Coverart for item
The Resource 3d Printing in Medicine

3d Printing in Medicine

Label
3d Printing in Medicine
Title
3d Printing in Medicine
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
This book examines the emerging market of 3D-printed biomaterials and its clinical applications. It focuses on commercial and premarket tools, and looks at applications within medicine and the future outlook for the field. It includes the fundamentals of 3D printing, including topics such as materials, and hardware; 3D printing applications within medicine; and 3D printing in diagnostics and drug development and for disease models, plus 3D printers for surgical practice
Member of
Cataloging source
YDX
Dewey number
610.28
Index
index present
LC call number
R856
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
NLM call number
  • 2017 G-308
  • W 26.5
Series statement
Woodhead Publishing series in biomaterials
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Three-dimensional printing
  • Biomedical engineering
  • Three-dimensional imaging in medicine
  • Printing, Three-Dimensional
  • Biomedical Technology
  • HEALTH & FITNESS
  • HEALTH & FITNESS
  • MEDICAL
  • MEDICAL
  • MEDICAL
  • MEDICAL
  • MEDICAL
  • MEDICAL
  • Biomedical engineering
  • Three-dimensional imaging in medicine
  • Three-dimensional printing
Label
3d Printing in Medicine
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover; 3D Printing in Medicine; Copyright Page; Contents; List of contributors; 1 Introduction to 3D printing in medicine; 1.1 3D printing is the latest industrial revolution; 1.1.1 Brief history of 3D printing; 1.1.2 Basic components of 3D printing; 1.2 3D bioprinting in medicine; 1.2.1 3D bioprinting approaches; 1.2.1.1 Biomimicry; 1.2.1.2 Independent self-assembly; 1.2.1.3 Miniature-tissue blocks; 1.2.2 Feasibility of organ printing technology; 1.2.3 In vivo behavior of 3D printed organ constructs; 1.3 Advantages of 3D printing for medicine
  • 1.3.1 Applications of 3D printing in medicine1.3.1.1 3D printing for surgical templates and diagnostic tools; 1.3.1.2 Organ printing technology; 1.3.1.3 3D disease modeling; 1.3.1.4 3D printing for commercial pharmaceutical products; 1.3.1.5 4D Bioprinting; 1.3.2 Limitations and challenges of 3D printing; 1.4 Future of 3D printing in medicine; References; 2 3D printing families: laser, powder, nozzle based techniques; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Classification of 3D printing techniques; 2.2.1 Resin-based systems; 2.2.2 Powder-based systems; 2.2.3 Extrusion-based systems; 2.2.4 Droplet-based systems
  • 2.3 Conclusions and future trendsReferences; 3 Materials for 3D printing in medicine: metals, polymers, ceramics, hydrogels; 3.1 Introduction; 3.1.1 Biomaterials; 3.1.2 Biocompatibility of biomaterials; 3.2 Metals; 3.2.1 Conventional metals and their alloys; 3.2.1.1 Titanium and its alloys; 3.2.1.2 Stainless steel, other metals, and alloys; 3.2.2 Shape memory alloys; 3.2.3 Biodegradable metals; 3.3 Bio-ceramics and bioactive glasses; 3.3.1 Nondegradable bio-ceramics; 3.3.2 Biodegradable and bioactive ceramics and glasses; 3.4 Polymers; 3.5 Hydrogels; 3.5.1 Bioinks for 3D bioprinting
  • 3.5.2 Natural polymer derived hydrogels3.5.2.1 ECM derived hyrdogels; 3.5.2.2 Nonmammalian sources derived polysaccharides; 3.5.3 Synthetic polymer derived hydrogels; 3.6 Summary and outlook; Acknowledgments; References; 4 Computational analyses and 3D printed models: a combined approach for patient-specific studies; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Patient specific models: image reconstruction; 4.3 Patient specific models: 3D Manufacturing; 4.4 Computer simulations of patient specific cardiac models; 4.5 Patient specific models: the current regulatory perspective
  • 4.6 Future perspective of patient specific models in cardiovascular applicationsReferences; 5 Patient specific in situ 3D printing; 5.1 Patient specific 3D printing; 5.1.1 Personalized medicine; 5.1.2 Introduction to the technology: 3D printing in personalized medicine; 5.1.3 Patient specific 3D model creation and design of tissue/organs; 5.2 Current medical applications for 3D printing; 5.2.1 3D bioprinting of organs and tissues; 5.2.1.1 3D bioprinting in vitro; 5.2.1.2 In situ 3D bioprinting directly to the defect/wound site
Control code
984542826
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780081007266
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
cl0500000856
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)984542826
Label
3d Printing in Medicine
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover; 3D Printing in Medicine; Copyright Page; Contents; List of contributors; 1 Introduction to 3D printing in medicine; 1.1 3D printing is the latest industrial revolution; 1.1.1 Brief history of 3D printing; 1.1.2 Basic components of 3D printing; 1.2 3D bioprinting in medicine; 1.2.1 3D bioprinting approaches; 1.2.1.1 Biomimicry; 1.2.1.2 Independent self-assembly; 1.2.1.3 Miniature-tissue blocks; 1.2.2 Feasibility of organ printing technology; 1.2.3 In vivo behavior of 3D printed organ constructs; 1.3 Advantages of 3D printing for medicine
  • 1.3.1 Applications of 3D printing in medicine1.3.1.1 3D printing for surgical templates and diagnostic tools; 1.3.1.2 Organ printing technology; 1.3.1.3 3D disease modeling; 1.3.1.4 3D printing for commercial pharmaceutical products; 1.3.1.5 4D Bioprinting; 1.3.2 Limitations and challenges of 3D printing; 1.4 Future of 3D printing in medicine; References; 2 3D printing families: laser, powder, nozzle based techniques; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Classification of 3D printing techniques; 2.2.1 Resin-based systems; 2.2.2 Powder-based systems; 2.2.3 Extrusion-based systems; 2.2.4 Droplet-based systems
  • 2.3 Conclusions and future trendsReferences; 3 Materials for 3D printing in medicine: metals, polymers, ceramics, hydrogels; 3.1 Introduction; 3.1.1 Biomaterials; 3.1.2 Biocompatibility of biomaterials; 3.2 Metals; 3.2.1 Conventional metals and their alloys; 3.2.1.1 Titanium and its alloys; 3.2.1.2 Stainless steel, other metals, and alloys; 3.2.2 Shape memory alloys; 3.2.3 Biodegradable metals; 3.3 Bio-ceramics and bioactive glasses; 3.3.1 Nondegradable bio-ceramics; 3.3.2 Biodegradable and bioactive ceramics and glasses; 3.4 Polymers; 3.5 Hydrogels; 3.5.1 Bioinks for 3D bioprinting
  • 3.5.2 Natural polymer derived hydrogels3.5.2.1 ECM derived hyrdogels; 3.5.2.2 Nonmammalian sources derived polysaccharides; 3.5.3 Synthetic polymer derived hydrogels; 3.6 Summary and outlook; Acknowledgments; References; 4 Computational analyses and 3D printed models: a combined approach for patient-specific studies; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Patient specific models: image reconstruction; 4.3 Patient specific models: 3D Manufacturing; 4.4 Computer simulations of patient specific cardiac models; 4.5 Patient specific models: the current regulatory perspective
  • 4.6 Future perspective of patient specific models in cardiovascular applicationsReferences; 5 Patient specific in situ 3D printing; 5.1 Patient specific 3D printing; 5.1.1 Personalized medicine; 5.1.2 Introduction to the technology: 3D printing in personalized medicine; 5.1.3 Patient specific 3D model creation and design of tissue/organs; 5.2 Current medical applications for 3D printing; 5.2.1 3D bioprinting of organs and tissues; 5.2.1.1 3D bioprinting in vitro; 5.2.1.2 In situ 3D bioprinting directly to the defect/wound site
Control code
984542826
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780081007266
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
cl0500000856
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)984542826

Library Locations

    • Ellis LibraryBorrow it
      1020 Lowry Street, Columbia, MO, 65201, US
      38.944491 -92.326012
    • Engineering Library & Technology CommonsBorrow it
      W2001 Lafferre Hall, Columbia, MO, 65211, US
      38.946102 -92.330125
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