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The Resource A short history of comparative literature from the earliest times to the present day, Translated by M. Douglas Power

A short history of comparative literature from the earliest times to the present day, Translated by M. Douglas Power

Label
A short history of comparative literature from the earliest times to the present day
Title
A short history of comparative literature from the earliest times to the present day
Statement of responsibility
Translated by M. Douglas Power
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • fre
  • eng
Related
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1856-1915
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Loliée, Frédéric
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Comparative literature
  • Literature
Label
A short history of comparative literature from the earliest times to the present day, Translated by M. Douglas Power
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "First published in 1906."
  • Translation of Histoire des littératures comparées des origines au XXe siècle
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • I. Before history -- First traces of thought -- Egypt at the beginning of the ancient world -- Many nurseries of culture appear in the dust of Chaldea -- Co-existent civilisations of peoples and races along the Euphrates and Tigris -- Far from Asia Minor -- Among the inhabitants of the Celestial Empire -- On the lofty plateaus of Central America -- In the India of the Vedas -- II. The oldest testimonies of Indian genius -- Asia and Europe compared -- The development of religious and lyric poetry in Sanskrit literature -- The Vedas -- Historical times -- Migrations of the Aryans across the world -- Europe -- Establishment of the Greeks -- III. Greece before the Greeks -- Half-fabulous origins of the Hellenic civilisation -- Times of the minstrels -- The Homeric period -- The Iliad and the Rhapsodists -- IV. Outside Greece -- Voluntary ignorance of other countries as to its whereabouts -- Consecutive development of the intellectual centres in India, Persia, Judaea, and Etruria, etc. -- Hellenism and "barbarianism" -- Growth and decline of a unique literature -- Displacement of Greek genius -- Pergamos and Alexandria -- Up to the year 540 before our era -- V. Before the Graeco-Latin fusion -- Beginning of their union -- Early Latin Poetry -- Ruin of Punic civilisation -- The time of Sylla -- The "age of Augustus" -- The entire work of civilisation -- Greatness and decline -- Renaissance of philosophical studies -- VI. The Silver Age of Latin literature -- Portrait of Trajan -- Rome at the height of her rule -- General view of the known world in the reign of Trajan -- Rapid decline -- The latest period of Greek and Roman literature -- Alexandria, the metropolis of the East -- The Alexandrian philosophers -- Parallel and rival development of Alexandrianism and Christianity -- Supreme effort of transformed paganism -- Julian -- The fourth century -- VII. Artistic decadence seems suspended -- Decadence hastened by the barbarian invasions -- Some wreckage -- Moral and social state of the peoples of Europe from the fifth to the eighth centuries -- Legends and folksongs of the Germans and Scandinavians -- Origin of the Eddas -- Debris of classical antiquity -- In the Eastern Empire a practical cessation of literary effort -- VIII. Charlemagne's Renaissance -- Striving towards civilisation -- Charlemagne, Alcuin, Rabanus Maurus -- Disorder at the end of the ninth and beginning of the tenth centuries -- The feudal world -- Ignorance once more overshadows Europe -- IX. Contrast between this general absence of culture and the brilliant state of learning in Asia -- Even in the extreme East -- China, Japan, the land of the Khmers, and Persia in the third century -- Arab learning form the eighth century onwards -- View of this civilisation -- Introduction of Arab books to the West -- X. The nationalities and languages of Europe are formed -- Dogma dominates the world -- Early struggles of popular and national poetry to be free of it -- Rise of the songs in praise of heroic action (chansons de geste) -- These unconsciously give place to sentimental tales of adventure and chivalry -- Cycle of the Round Table -- Its origins -- The tales of the Round Table exert extraordinary influence on the aesthetic ideas of rising European literatures and on the general outlook
  • XI. General aspect of the thirteenth century -- Essential unity of literatures in the initial stages -- Simultaneous development of letters and arts in France, England, Germany, and among the peoples of Southern Europe -- "Touveres" and "Troubadours" -- Anglo-Saxon minstrels -- German "Minne singers" -- Popular poetry shakes off the predominance of ecclesiasticism and feudal abuses -- XII. Birth-struggle of a new age -- Grave aspects of the fourteenth century -- Violent transformation of peoples and ideas -- Forerunners of the Reformation -- Wicliff -- John Huss -- Jerome of Prague -- Predominance of political and social facts over the uncertain movement of letters -- Fail of the Eastern Empire -- This catastrophe brings Greek literature from Constantinople to Italy -- Fall of Arab civilisation in Spain -- Relative sterility of the French genius -- The torch of civilisation passes into the hands of Italy -- The dawn of the Renaissance -- XIII. Social troubles abroad -- Wonderful expansion of arts and literature in Italy -- The revival of ancient learning -- Two great historical facts : the renaissance of letters and the reformation of religion -- The link uniting them -- Their parallel advance -- Luther, Erasmus, and Melancthon -- Distant re-echo of the Reformation in literature -- XIV. Violent party and doctrinal conflicts -- Calvin at Geneva -- John Knox and Presbyterianism in Scotland -- The social and religious counter-revolution -- Ignatius Loyola -- The Council of Trent -- Prodigious mental activity despite the numberless evils which crushed the nations of Europe and elsewhere -- A moment's consideration of the ruin of two exotic civilisations: Peru and Mexico -- Public calamities do not check the progress of letters in the Italy of Tasso and Aristo ; nor in the England of Shakespeare ; nor int he Spain of Cervantes ; nor in Portugal, the birthplace of Camoens ; nor even in Turkey, whose "golden age" it is -- Return to the development of French literature -- XV. Dawn of the great classical period -- Troublous times still -- Vagaries of slavish imitation of Italy and Spain -- Unsteadiness of purpose in literature -- "Concettism," "Cultish," pedantry -- Marinism, Gongorism, and Estilo Culto -- Reaction of good taste and common sense -- The seventeenth century at its zenith in France, in England -- State of society after the sombre days of Puritanism -- Complete reaction in favour of license at the Restoration ; striking outburst of the comic vein -- State of Italian culture -- Spain, Holland, and Germany -- After the Thirty Years' War -- Grave moral distress -- The Franco-German period -- Most European nations evince a similar love for imitation -- XVI. The actual commencement of the philosophic age somewhat vague -- Characteristic independence of literature may now be seen -- The French Encyclopedists -- Voltaire, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Diderot -- Interchange of ideas among the different nations and especially between England and France -- Literary supremacy of the latter till about 1789
  • XVII. The intellectual movement brings about social revolution in France -- Ten years of trouble -- The same period in England and Germany -- Germany becomes prominent in intellectual matters -- Wonderful development of thought in Germany -- Poets and philosophers -- This great intellectual activity succeeded by a period of lassitude and discouragement -- The melancholy of Werther ; the Weltschmerz or mal de siecle -- XVIII. The beginning of the Romantic movement, the effects of which influence the while of Europe -- In every realm of thought vast prospects are opened up -- Reorganisation of study -- The cultivation of the purely imaginative side -- Pure philosophy -- Romantic poetry -- Its transformations and different expression in France, England, Italy, Spain, Russia, Poland, Scandinavia -- XIX. Romanticism exhausted all the resources of imagination and fancy -- Reaction towards reality -- Other conditions of social and political life and of the moral code -- The Second Empire -- Realism in literature -- The various forms it assumed in Europe -- Naturalism in France ; its imitation in other countries -- New schools are founded -- XX. Great division among literary groups -- Neo-Hellenism in France and elsewhere -- Neo-Christianity and mystical parodies -- The Symbolist -- The cosmopolitan character of literature in general -- Its most recent expression in France, England, the United States, Spain and Italy -- New centres of culture -- Dawn of the twentieth century -- CONCLUSION -- 1. The first ideas which arise from the considerations of the history of so many literatures -- The uncertainty of various works and of their authors -- Literary wreckage -- The most palpable results of reviewing a wide field of work -- 2. Common characteristics of great intellectual movements -- Similarity between different epochs of literature -- 3. The common sources of inspiration and basis of the first and general ideas from which the human mind has drawn in all ages -- 4. The contribution of each nation to the general stock without any taking absolute pre-eminence -- 5-7. The right of precedence disputed among the various civilisations both ancient and modern ; in most instances not a lasting or exclusive privilege -- The growth and decline of literatures which were at one time predominant -- Their respective merits ; Their advantages and relative imperfections -- The Oriental imagination ; its charms and its illusions and relative imperfections -- Greek genius and its weaker side -- The French mind -- The Italian and Spanish mind -- German thought -- Anglo-Saxon talent -- The literary temperament of the Russian -- i-9. Interdependence of literatures ; their continual exchanges and mutual loans -- 10-11. Distinct in both origin and character, we see them blend in harmonious unity -- The concentration and narrowing of range of to-day -- The future of language and literature
Control code
90566
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
xii, 381 pages
Isbn
9780804613613
Lccn
74105803
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
(WaOLN)526955
Label
A short history of comparative literature from the earliest times to the present day, Translated by M. Douglas Power
Publication
Note
  • "First published in 1906."
  • Translation of Histoire des littératures comparées des origines au XXe siècle
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • I. Before history -- First traces of thought -- Egypt at the beginning of the ancient world -- Many nurseries of culture appear in the dust of Chaldea -- Co-existent civilisations of peoples and races along the Euphrates and Tigris -- Far from Asia Minor -- Among the inhabitants of the Celestial Empire -- On the lofty plateaus of Central America -- In the India of the Vedas -- II. The oldest testimonies of Indian genius -- Asia and Europe compared -- The development of religious and lyric poetry in Sanskrit literature -- The Vedas -- Historical times -- Migrations of the Aryans across the world -- Europe -- Establishment of the Greeks -- III. Greece before the Greeks -- Half-fabulous origins of the Hellenic civilisation -- Times of the minstrels -- The Homeric period -- The Iliad and the Rhapsodists -- IV. Outside Greece -- Voluntary ignorance of other countries as to its whereabouts -- Consecutive development of the intellectual centres in India, Persia, Judaea, and Etruria, etc. -- Hellenism and "barbarianism" -- Growth and decline of a unique literature -- Displacement of Greek genius -- Pergamos and Alexandria -- Up to the year 540 before our era -- V. Before the Graeco-Latin fusion -- Beginning of their union -- Early Latin Poetry -- Ruin of Punic civilisation -- The time of Sylla -- The "age of Augustus" -- The entire work of civilisation -- Greatness and decline -- Renaissance of philosophical studies -- VI. The Silver Age of Latin literature -- Portrait of Trajan -- Rome at the height of her rule -- General view of the known world in the reign of Trajan -- Rapid decline -- The latest period of Greek and Roman literature -- Alexandria, the metropolis of the East -- The Alexandrian philosophers -- Parallel and rival development of Alexandrianism and Christianity -- Supreme effort of transformed paganism -- Julian -- The fourth century -- VII. Artistic decadence seems suspended -- Decadence hastened by the barbarian invasions -- Some wreckage -- Moral and social state of the peoples of Europe from the fifth to the eighth centuries -- Legends and folksongs of the Germans and Scandinavians -- Origin of the Eddas -- Debris of classical antiquity -- In the Eastern Empire a practical cessation of literary effort -- VIII. Charlemagne's Renaissance -- Striving towards civilisation -- Charlemagne, Alcuin, Rabanus Maurus -- Disorder at the end of the ninth and beginning of the tenth centuries -- The feudal world -- Ignorance once more overshadows Europe -- IX. Contrast between this general absence of culture and the brilliant state of learning in Asia -- Even in the extreme East -- China, Japan, the land of the Khmers, and Persia in the third century -- Arab learning form the eighth century onwards -- View of this civilisation -- Introduction of Arab books to the West -- X. The nationalities and languages of Europe are formed -- Dogma dominates the world -- Early struggles of popular and national poetry to be free of it -- Rise of the songs in praise of heroic action (chansons de geste) -- These unconsciously give place to sentimental tales of adventure and chivalry -- Cycle of the Round Table -- Its origins -- The tales of the Round Table exert extraordinary influence on the aesthetic ideas of rising European literatures and on the general outlook
  • XI. General aspect of the thirteenth century -- Essential unity of literatures in the initial stages -- Simultaneous development of letters and arts in France, England, Germany, and among the peoples of Southern Europe -- "Touveres" and "Troubadours" -- Anglo-Saxon minstrels -- German "Minne singers" -- Popular poetry shakes off the predominance of ecclesiasticism and feudal abuses -- XII. Birth-struggle of a new age -- Grave aspects of the fourteenth century -- Violent transformation of peoples and ideas -- Forerunners of the Reformation -- Wicliff -- John Huss -- Jerome of Prague -- Predominance of political and social facts over the uncertain movement of letters -- Fail of the Eastern Empire -- This catastrophe brings Greek literature from Constantinople to Italy -- Fall of Arab civilisation in Spain -- Relative sterility of the French genius -- The torch of civilisation passes into the hands of Italy -- The dawn of the Renaissance -- XIII. Social troubles abroad -- Wonderful expansion of arts and literature in Italy -- The revival of ancient learning -- Two great historical facts : the renaissance of letters and the reformation of religion -- The link uniting them -- Their parallel advance -- Luther, Erasmus, and Melancthon -- Distant re-echo of the Reformation in literature -- XIV. Violent party and doctrinal conflicts -- Calvin at Geneva -- John Knox and Presbyterianism in Scotland -- The social and religious counter-revolution -- Ignatius Loyola -- The Council of Trent -- Prodigious mental activity despite the numberless evils which crushed the nations of Europe and elsewhere -- A moment's consideration of the ruin of two exotic civilisations: Peru and Mexico -- Public calamities do not check the progress of letters in the Italy of Tasso and Aristo ; nor in the England of Shakespeare ; nor int he Spain of Cervantes ; nor in Portugal, the birthplace of Camoens ; nor even in Turkey, whose "golden age" it is -- Return to the development of French literature -- XV. Dawn of the great classical period -- Troublous times still -- Vagaries of slavish imitation of Italy and Spain -- Unsteadiness of purpose in literature -- "Concettism," "Cultish," pedantry -- Marinism, Gongorism, and Estilo Culto -- Reaction of good taste and common sense -- The seventeenth century at its zenith in France, in England -- State of society after the sombre days of Puritanism -- Complete reaction in favour of license at the Restoration ; striking outburst of the comic vein -- State of Italian culture -- Spain, Holland, and Germany -- After the Thirty Years' War -- Grave moral distress -- The Franco-German period -- Most European nations evince a similar love for imitation -- XVI. The actual commencement of the philosophic age somewhat vague -- Characteristic independence of literature may now be seen -- The French Encyclopedists -- Voltaire, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Diderot -- Interchange of ideas among the different nations and especially between England and France -- Literary supremacy of the latter till about 1789
  • XVII. The intellectual movement brings about social revolution in France -- Ten years of trouble -- The same period in England and Germany -- Germany becomes prominent in intellectual matters -- Wonderful development of thought in Germany -- Poets and philosophers -- This great intellectual activity succeeded by a period of lassitude and discouragement -- The melancholy of Werther ; the Weltschmerz or mal de siecle -- XVIII. The beginning of the Romantic movement, the effects of which influence the while of Europe -- In every realm of thought vast prospects are opened up -- Reorganisation of study -- The cultivation of the purely imaginative side -- Pure philosophy -- Romantic poetry -- Its transformations and different expression in France, England, Italy, Spain, Russia, Poland, Scandinavia -- XIX. Romanticism exhausted all the resources of imagination and fancy -- Reaction towards reality -- Other conditions of social and political life and of the moral code -- The Second Empire -- Realism in literature -- The various forms it assumed in Europe -- Naturalism in France ; its imitation in other countries -- New schools are founded -- XX. Great division among literary groups -- Neo-Hellenism in France and elsewhere -- Neo-Christianity and mystical parodies -- The Symbolist -- The cosmopolitan character of literature in general -- Its most recent expression in France, England, the United States, Spain and Italy -- New centres of culture -- Dawn of the twentieth century -- CONCLUSION -- 1. The first ideas which arise from the considerations of the history of so many literatures -- The uncertainty of various works and of their authors -- Literary wreckage -- The most palpable results of reviewing a wide field of work -- 2. Common characteristics of great intellectual movements -- Similarity between different epochs of literature -- 3. The common sources of inspiration and basis of the first and general ideas from which the human mind has drawn in all ages -- 4. The contribution of each nation to the general stock without any taking absolute pre-eminence -- 5-7. The right of precedence disputed among the various civilisations both ancient and modern ; in most instances not a lasting or exclusive privilege -- The growth and decline of literatures which were at one time predominant -- Their respective merits ; Their advantages and relative imperfections -- The Oriental imagination ; its charms and its illusions and relative imperfections -- Greek genius and its weaker side -- The French mind -- The Italian and Spanish mind -- German thought -- Anglo-Saxon talent -- The literary temperament of the Russian -- i-9. Interdependence of literatures ; their continual exchanges and mutual loans -- 10-11. Distinct in both origin and character, we see them blend in harmonious unity -- The concentration and narrowing of range of to-day -- The future of language and literature
Control code
90566
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
xii, 381 pages
Isbn
9780804613613
Lccn
74105803
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
(WaOLN)526955

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