The Resource Answering looks of sympathy and love : subjectivity and the narcissus myth in Renaissance English literature, by Celestin J. Walby

Answering looks of sympathy and love : subjectivity and the narcissus myth in Renaissance English literature, by Celestin J. Walby

Label
Answering looks of sympathy and love : subjectivity and the narcissus myth in Renaissance English literature
Title
Answering looks of sympathy and love
Title remainder
subjectivity and the narcissus myth in Renaissance English literature
Statement of responsibility
by Celestin J. Walby
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Given the numerous and popular "moralizations" of Ovid's Metamorphoses during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, the literary use of Ovid's Narcissus myth in these periods has been largely interpreted as a Neo-Platonic validation of hierarchical order and the self-sufficiency of the divine, rational subject. This "subject-centered" approach, however, in which past theories of human nature, reality, and self-knowledge are taken at face value, has been heavily criticized in recent years, especially among New Historicists. To counteract the bias of assuming a Platonic "autonomy of self," New Historicists in their readings of the myth typically emphasize an Ovidian eroticism or linguistic "metamorphosis" that radically disrupts the stability of social order and the rational subject. Often these critics view the "pre-modern" literary use of Ovid's Narcissus myth as an anticipation of the postmodern conviction that reality is a play of language, empty at the core. Drawing on Habermas's speech act theory of communicative action, this dissertation offers an understanding of subjectivity that differs from both a "philosophy of unified consciousness" and a "theory of autonomous discourse." In this speech act approach, the subject is defined in terms of social interaction and intersubjective agreement with other subjects, not in terms of solitary self-reflective unity or objectifying strategic domination. Rather than an unassailable (Platonic) unity of the self or the (Foucauldian) autonomy of a "disembodied" voice, the Echo and Narcissus myth dramatizes the classical concept of "self-cultivation," a reciprocal exercise of virtue with others in the formation and maintenance of personal and national identity. Allusions to this critical demand for intersubjective mutuality in Ovid's Narcissus myth contribute to a critique and redefinition of the self-sufficient epic hero in Shakespeare's epyllia, Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece , in his play Troilus and Cressida , and in Milton's Paradise Lost
Additional physical form
Also available on the Internet.
Cataloging source
MUU
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1965-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Walby, Celestin J.
Degree
Ph. D.
Dissertation year
2004.
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Granting institution
University of Missouri-Columbia
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • bibliography
  • theses
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Narcissism in literature
  • Subjectivity in literature
  • English literature
  • European literature
Target audience
specialized
Label
Answering looks of sympathy and love : subjectivity and the narcissus myth in Renaissance English literature, by Celestin J. Walby
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Typescript
  • Vita
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 265-279)
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
58963252
Dimensions
29 cm
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
vii, 280 leaves
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Specific material designation
remote
Label
Answering looks of sympathy and love : subjectivity and the narcissus myth in Renaissance English literature, by Celestin J. Walby
Publication
Note
  • Typescript
  • Vita
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 265-279)
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
58963252
Dimensions
29 cm
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
vii, 280 leaves
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

    • University of Missouri Libraries DepositoryBorrow it
      2908 Lemone Blvd, Columbia, MO, 65211, US
      38.919360 -92.291620
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