Coverart for item
The Resource By the sweat of the brow : literature and labor in antebellum America, Nicholas K. Bromell

By the sweat of the brow : literature and labor in antebellum America, Nicholas K. Bromell

Label
By the sweat of the brow : literature and labor in antebellum America
Title
By the sweat of the brow
Title remainder
literature and labor in antebellum America
Statement of responsibility
Nicholas K. Bromell
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
The spread of industrialism, the emergence of professionalism, the challenge to slavery - these and other developments fueled an anxious debate about work in antebellum America. In this book, Nicholas K. Bromell discusses the ways in which American writers participated in this cultural contestation of the nature and meaning of work. In chapters on Thoreau, Melville, Hawthorne, Rebecca Harding Davis, Susan Warner, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Frederick Douglass, Bromell shows how these writers not only scrutinized work - be it factory labor, agriculture, maternal labor, or slave labor - but also reflected upon its relation to their own work of writing. Bromell argues that American writers generally sensed a deep affinity between the mental labor of writing and such bodily labors as blacksmithing, house building, housework, mothering, field labor, growing beans, and so on. Nevertheless, writers resisted identifying their labor as purely or simply bodily, both because society placed mental and spiritual labor at the top of its scale of values and because the body was so often the site of gender or racial subjugation. Bromell also makes important contributions to three areas of nineteenth-century social history. He probes the period's conflicting ideas of mothers as both spiritual "angels of the house" and ineluctably embodied laborers in the home. Using as an example the exhibitions of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, he discusses the advent of an industrial ideology that sought to devalue the meaning of skilled manual labor. Finally, he suggests that, paradoxically, slaves were sometimes able to find in their labor a mode of self-actualization within slavery. Deftly combining literary and social history, canonical and noncanonical texts, primary source material and contemporary theory, By the Sweat of the Brow establishes work as an important subject of cultural criticism. At the same time, it contributes to discussions of race, gender, and the body in American literary studies
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Bromell, Nicholas Knowles
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • American literature
  • Working class writings, American
  • Slaves' writings, American
  • Working class
  • Slavery in literature
  • Working class in literature
  • Work in literature
Label
By the sweat of the brow : literature and labor in antebellum America, Nicholas K. Bromell
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 245-267) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Manual Labor and the Problem of Literary Representation -- The Meaning and Demeaning of Manual Labor at the Exhibitions of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association -- The Erotics of Labor in Meoville's Redburn -- Naturalized Labor and Natural History in Thoreau's A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers -- Women Carved of Oak and Korl: The female body as the Site of gendered Labor in Hawthorne and Davis -- The Labored Discourse of Domesticity -- Maternal Labor in the Work of "Literary Domestics": Catharine Maria Sedgwick and Susan Warner -- Literary Composition as Maternal Labor in Uncle Tom's Cabin -- The Meanings of Work and Song in Antebellum Slavery -- Slavery, Work, and Song in Frederick Douglass's Autobiographies -- "By the Labor of My Hands Only": The Making and Unmaking of Walden
Control code
27935466
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
ix, 278 pages
Isbn
9780226075556
Isbn Type
(pbk. : alk. paper)
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(WaOLN)1555970
Label
By the sweat of the brow : literature and labor in antebellum America, Nicholas K. Bromell
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 245-267) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Manual Labor and the Problem of Literary Representation -- The Meaning and Demeaning of Manual Labor at the Exhibitions of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association -- The Erotics of Labor in Meoville's Redburn -- Naturalized Labor and Natural History in Thoreau's A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers -- Women Carved of Oak and Korl: The female body as the Site of gendered Labor in Hawthorne and Davis -- The Labored Discourse of Domesticity -- Maternal Labor in the Work of "Literary Domestics": Catharine Maria Sedgwick and Susan Warner -- Literary Composition as Maternal Labor in Uncle Tom's Cabin -- The Meanings of Work and Song in Antebellum Slavery -- Slavery, Work, and Song in Frederick Douglass's Autobiographies -- "By the Labor of My Hands Only": The Making and Unmaking of Walden
Control code
27935466
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
ix, 278 pages
Isbn
9780226075556
Isbn Type
(pbk. : alk. paper)
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(WaOLN)1555970

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