The Resource Captured by Indians : manifestations of the indian captivity narrative in the early American novel, by Lee Foard Furbeck

Captured by Indians : manifestations of the indian captivity narrative in the early American novel, by Lee Foard Furbeck

Label
Captured by Indians : manifestations of the indian captivity narrative in the early American novel
Title
Captured by Indians
Title remainder
manifestations of the indian captivity narrative in the early American novel
Statement of responsibility
by Lee Foard Furbeck
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
From the late seventeenth to the early nineteenth century, Indian captivity narratives were widely read in America and abroad. Originally serving as tools for religious instruction, the narratives evolved first into anti-Indian manifestos and later into sentimental didacticism. By 1800, readers no longer took the narratives seriously. Thus, as the American frontier experience united with the English romantic plot, Indian captivity metamorphosed into a plot episode in the frontier romance and a metaphor for captivity and powerlessness in the domestic novel. Appearing regularly as plot episodes and metaphorically in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the Indian captivity narratives have exerted a vast influence on the formation of American literature. Six representative works spanning one hundred years highlight formulaic elements of the genre: the narratives of Hannah Swarton (1697); Hannah Dustan (1697); John Williams (1707); Elizabeth Hanson (1728); John Gyles (1736); and Mary Kinnan (1795). Also formulaic, Ann Eliza Bleecker's The History of Maria Kittle serves as an early example of a fictionalized Indian captivity narrative. Subsequent chapters illustrate various fictional manifestations of the Indian captivity narrative. Charles Brockden Brown utilizes it to comment on the savage nature of man in an American version of the Gothic tale, Edgar Huntly (1799). In A Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison (1824), James Everett Seaver provides a semi-fictionalized account in which the voice of the narrator and the voice of the subject compete, ultimately delivering a mixed message about humankind. Lydia Maria Child expands "captivity" to include the metaphorical captivity of women in Hobomok (1824), and Catharine Maria Sedgwick in Hope Leslie (1827) utilizes the captivity narrative form to create a version of the frontier romance in which Indians and whites play interchangeable roles. Ultimately, all highlight commonalties between whites and Indians for the purpose of defining the human condition while continuing to condemn the Indian characters to racial extermination
Additional physical form
Also available on the Internet.
Cataloging source
MUU
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1966-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Furbeck, Lee Foard
Degree
Ph. D.
Dissertation year
1998.
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Granting institution
University of Missouri-Columbia
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Brown, Charles Brockden
  • Sedgwick, Catharine Maria
  • Child, Lydia Maria
  • Indian captivities
  • Novelists, American
Target audience
specialized
Label
Captured by Indians : manifestations of the indian captivity narrative in the early American novel, by Lee Foard Furbeck
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Typescript
  • Vita
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (leaves [239]-246)
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
43411034
Dimensions
29 cm
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
xviii, 247 leaves
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Specific material designation
remote
Label
Captured by Indians : manifestations of the indian captivity narrative in the early American novel, by Lee Foard Furbeck
Publication
Note
  • Typescript
  • Vita
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (leaves [239]-246)
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
43411034
Dimensions
29 cm
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
xviii, 247 leaves
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

    • University of Missouri Libraries DepositoryBorrow it
      2908 Lemone Blvd, Columbia, MO, 65211, US
      38.919360 -92.291620
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