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The Resource Civil Examinations and Meritocracy in Late Imperial China, Benjamin A. Elman

Civil Examinations and Meritocracy in Late Imperial China, Benjamin A. Elman

Label
Civil Examinations and Meritocracy in Late Imperial China
Title
Civil Examinations and Meritocracy in Late Imperial China
Statement of responsibility
Benjamin A. Elman
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • "During China's late imperial period (roughly 1400-1900 CE), men would gather by the millions every two or three years outside official examination compounds sprinkled across China. Only one percent of candidates would complete the academic regimen that would earn them a post in the administrative bureaucracy. Civil Examinations assesses the role of education, examination, and China's civil service in fostering the world's first professional class based on demonstrated knowledge and skill."--book jacket
  • During China's late imperial period (roughly 1400-1900 CE), men would gather by the millions every two or three years outside official examination compounds sprinkled across China. Only one percent of candidates would complete the academic regimen that would earn them a post in the administrative bureaucracy. Civil Examinations assesses the role of education, examination, and China's civil service in fostering the world's first professional class based on demonstrated knowledge and skill. While millions of men dreamed of the worldly advancement an imperial education promised, many more wondered what went on inside the prestigious walled-off examination compounds. As Benjamin A. Elman reveals, what occured was the weaving of a complex social web. Civil examinations had been instituted in China as early as the seventh century CE, but in the Ming and Qing eras they were the nexus linking the intellectual, political, and economic life of Imperial China. Local elites and members of the court sought to influence how the government regulated the classical curriculum and selected civil officials. As a guarantor of educational merit, civil examinations served to tie the dynasty to the privileged gentry and literati classes-both ideologically and institutionally. China did away with its classical examination system in 1905. But this carefully balanced and constantly contested piece of social engineering, worked out over the course of centuries, was an early harbinger of the meritocratic regime of college boards and other entrance exams that undergirds higher education in much of the world today
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1946-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Elman, Benjamin A.
Index
index present
LC call number
JQ1512.Z13
LC item number
E8721115 2013
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Civil service
Label
Civil Examinations and Meritocracy in Late Imperial China, Benjamin A. Elman
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Control code
840460712
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xi, 401 pages
Isbn
9780674724952
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2013009713
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)840460712
Label
Civil Examinations and Meritocracy in Late Imperial China, Benjamin A. Elman
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Control code
840460712
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xi, 401 pages
Isbn
9780674724952
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2013009713
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)840460712

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