Coverart for item
The Resource Cutting into the meatpacking line : workers and change in the rural Midwest, Deborah Fink

Cutting into the meatpacking line : workers and change in the rural Midwest, Deborah Fink

Label
Cutting into the meatpacking line : workers and change in the rural Midwest
Title
Cutting into the meatpacking line
Title remainder
workers and change in the rural Midwest
Statement of responsibility
Deborah Fink
Title variation
Cutting into the meat packing line
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • Fink draws both on interviews and on her own firsthand experience working on the production floor of a pork-processing plant. She weaves a fascinating account of the meatpacking industry's history in Iowa - a history, she notes, that has been experienced differently by male and female, immigrant and native-born, white and black workers. Indeed, argues Fink, these differences are a key factor in the ongoing creation of the rural working class
  • Other writers have denounced the new meatpacking companies for their ruthless destruction of both workers and communities. Fink sustains this criticism, which she augments with a discussion of union action, but also goes beyond it. She looks within rural midwestern culture itself to examine the class, gender, and ethnic contradictions that allowed - indeed welcomed - the meatpacking industry's development
  • The nostalgic vision of a rural Midwest populated by independent family farmers hides the reality that rural wage labor has been integral to the region's development, says Deborah Fink. Focusing on the porkpacking industry in Iowa, Fink investigates the experience of the rural working class and highlights its significance in shaping the state's economic, political, and social contours
  • The nostalgic vision of a rural Midwest populated by independent family farmers hides the reality that rural wage labor has been integral to the region's development, says Deborah Fink. Focusing on the porkpacking industry in Iowa, Fink investigates the experience of the rural working class and highlights its significance in shaping the state's economic, political, and social contours
  • Fink draws both on interviews and on her own firsthand experience working on the production floor of a pork-processing plant. She weaves a fascinating account of the meatpacking industry's history in Iowa - a history, she notes, that has been experienced differently by male and female, immigrant and native-born, white and black workers. Indeed, argues Fink, these differences are a key factor in the ongoing creation of the rural working class
  • Other writers have denounced the new meatpacking companies for their ruthless destruction of both workers and communities. Fink sustains this criticism, which she augments with a discussion of union action, but also goes beyond it. She looks within rural midwestern culture itself to examine the class, gender, and ethnic contradictions that allowed - indeed welcomed - the meatpacking industry's development
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1944-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Fink, Deborah
Dewey number
331.7/6649/00973
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • portraits
Index
index present
LC call number
HD8039.P152
LC item number
U535 1998
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
Studies in rural culture
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Packing-house workers
  • Packing-house workers
Label
Cutting into the meatpacking line : workers and change in the rural Midwest, Deborah Fink
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [203]-225) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
1. What Is Your Problem, Ruth?: An Anthropologist Gets a Job -- 2. What More Better Work Could You Ask For?: Perry Working Men and Meatpacking -- 3. Frankly, She's Not Worth It: Working Through Gender -- 4. Who's Francisco?: Race/Ethnicity and Rural Iowa Workers -- 5. Hey, You Guys Are Not Entitled: The Workings of Class
Control code
36969808
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xv, 235 pages
Isbn
9780807846957
Isbn Type
(pbk. : alk. paper)
Lccn
97022006
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, portraits
Label
Cutting into the meatpacking line : workers and change in the rural Midwest, Deborah Fink
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [203]-225) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
1. What Is Your Problem, Ruth?: An Anthropologist Gets a Job -- 2. What More Better Work Could You Ask For?: Perry Working Men and Meatpacking -- 3. Frankly, She's Not Worth It: Working Through Gender -- 4. Who's Francisco?: Race/Ethnicity and Rural Iowa Workers -- 5. Hey, You Guys Are Not Entitled: The Workings of Class
Control code
36969808
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xv, 235 pages
Isbn
9780807846957
Isbn Type
(pbk. : alk. paper)
Lccn
97022006
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, portraits

Library Locations

    • Ellis LibraryBorrow it
      1020 Lowry Street, Columbia, MO, 65201, US
      38.944491 -92.326012
Processing Feedback ...