Coverart for item
The Resource From additive manufacturing to 3D/4D printing, 2, Current techniques, improvements and their limitations, Jean-Claude André

From additive manufacturing to 3D/4D printing, 2, Current techniques, improvements and their limitations, Jean-Claude André

Label
From additive manufacturing to 3D/4D printing, 2, Current techniques, improvements and their limitations
Title
From additive manufacturing to 3D/4D printing
Title number
2
Title part
Current techniques, improvements and their limitations
Statement of responsibility
Jean-Claude André
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Additive manufacturing, which was first invented in France and then applied in the United States, is now 33 years old and represents a market of around 5 billion euros per year, with annual growth of between 20 and 30%. Today, additive manufacturing is experiencing a great amount of innovation in its processes, software, engineering and materials used. Its strength as a process has more recently allowed for the exploration of new niches, ranging from applications at nanometer and decameter scales, to others in mechanics and health. As a result, the limitations of the process have also begun to emerge, which include the quality of the tools, their cost of manufacture, the multi-material aspects, functionalities and surface conditions. Volume 2 of this series presents the current techniques, improvements and limits of additive manufacturing, providing an up-to-date review of this process
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
André, Jean-Claude
Dewey number
621.9/88
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
TS171.95
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Systems and industrial engineering - robotics series
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Three-dimensional printing
  • Materials
  • Manufacturing processes
  • TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING
  • Manufacturing processes
  • Materials
  • Three-dimensional printing
Label
From additive manufacturing to 3D/4D printing, 2, Current techniques, improvements and their limitations, Jean-Claude André
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Part 1. Incremental Innovations and Technologies Pushed to their Limits -- Chapter 1. Incremental Developments of Processes, Machines and Materials -- Undertaking non-layered stereolithography -- Optimizing the light supply within a single-photon process -- Transparent window -- Gaseous interface -- Simultaneous two-photon absorption -- Challenging the notion of layers -- Addition of prefabricated structures -- Proof of concept -- Synthesis -- Optical-quality surface finish -- Glasses lenses and contact lenses -- From Additive Manufacturing to 3D/4D Printing -- Microlenses -- Direct lens manufacture --Multi-mode optical fiber -- Cold-cast metal 3D printing -- Electrolytic deposition -- Metallic ink -- Laser processes -- Photochemistry -- Silver metal -- Conducting polymers -- Colored objects -- Part 2. Additive Manufacturing Pushed to its Limits -- Chapter 2. æ-Fluidics (or Microfluidics) -- Review of microfluidics -- Applications -- Return to additive manufacturing -- Comment 1: LIFT process (Laser-Induced Forward Transfer) -- Comment 2: FEBID process (Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition) -- Other methods -- Hybrid methods -- Conclusive outcomes -- The converse problem: a potential æ-fluidics application to additive manufacturing -- 3D sintering -- Deposition of polymerized particles -- Provisional concept --Chapter 3. 3D Nanomanufacturing, 3D æ-Electronics and æ-Robotics -- 3D nano-facturing -- Smart material: so-called "DNA origami" -- Return from additive manufacturing to standard methods --Comment: nanomaterials and additive manufacturing -- Conclusion -- 3D æ-electronics -- 2D or 3D electronic circuits -- Subtractive/additive coupling -- æ-Electronics -- Conclusion and aspirations in the sphere -- Actuators and æ-robots -- Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Part 3. How Should We Go That One Step Further? Chapter 4. A Short Reflection on Spheres to Explore Their Conditions for Achieving Success -- Introduction -- Favored spheres of innovation -- How to know where we must anticipate this technology? -- Opportunities -- Some conditions to ensure additive manufacturing reaches maturity? -- Moreover where does additive manufacturing sit within this interdisciplinarity framework? -- Observations -- Some possible solutions? --Proposed solutions? -- A positive conclusion -- Bibliography -- Chapter 5. Questions of Hope and "Unhope" -- The "lab-tribe" (LT) approach -- Context elements -- From Additive Manufacturing to 3D/4D Printing -- Some results -- Scientific excellence" -- Financing and the orientation of research -- Prospective opportunities for the research unit -- Collective projects? Risky projects? -- Creativity's place in research -- Support to creativity? -- But all the same, strong brakes on creativity -- What to do? -- Innovation, a consequence of creativity -- Academic system -- Between productions resulting from science and responsible conscience -- Engagement toward a future focused on innovation? -- Caught between two chairs? Between more than two chairs? -- Innovation as scientific production: is it born of freedom? What freedom? -- What solutions to evoke for additive manufacturing? -- General framing -- And if the history of additive manufacturing in France were examined in light of these comments? -- A bit of creativity? -- In the form of a conclusion: a summary of the author's point of view -- Bibliography -- Conclusion -- Index
Control code
1008962869
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781119437376
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
color illustrations
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
cl0500000956
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1008962869
Label
From additive manufacturing to 3D/4D printing, 2, Current techniques, improvements and their limitations, Jean-Claude André
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Part 1. Incremental Innovations and Technologies Pushed to their Limits -- Chapter 1. Incremental Developments of Processes, Machines and Materials -- Undertaking non-layered stereolithography -- Optimizing the light supply within a single-photon process -- Transparent window -- Gaseous interface -- Simultaneous two-photon absorption -- Challenging the notion of layers -- Addition of prefabricated structures -- Proof of concept -- Synthesis -- Optical-quality surface finish -- Glasses lenses and contact lenses -- From Additive Manufacturing to 3D/4D Printing -- Microlenses -- Direct lens manufacture --Multi-mode optical fiber -- Cold-cast metal 3D printing -- Electrolytic deposition -- Metallic ink -- Laser processes -- Photochemistry -- Silver metal -- Conducting polymers -- Colored objects -- Part 2. Additive Manufacturing Pushed to its Limits -- Chapter 2. æ-Fluidics (or Microfluidics) -- Review of microfluidics -- Applications -- Return to additive manufacturing -- Comment 1: LIFT process (Laser-Induced Forward Transfer) -- Comment 2: FEBID process (Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition) -- Other methods -- Hybrid methods -- Conclusive outcomes -- The converse problem: a potential æ-fluidics application to additive manufacturing -- 3D sintering -- Deposition of polymerized particles -- Provisional concept --Chapter 3. 3D Nanomanufacturing, 3D æ-Electronics and æ-Robotics -- 3D nano-facturing -- Smart material: so-called "DNA origami" -- Return from additive manufacturing to standard methods --Comment: nanomaterials and additive manufacturing -- Conclusion -- 3D æ-electronics -- 2D or 3D electronic circuits -- Subtractive/additive coupling -- æ-Electronics -- Conclusion and aspirations in the sphere -- Actuators and æ-robots -- Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Part 3. How Should We Go That One Step Further? Chapter 4. A Short Reflection on Spheres to Explore Their Conditions for Achieving Success -- Introduction -- Favored spheres of innovation -- How to know where we must anticipate this technology? -- Opportunities -- Some conditions to ensure additive manufacturing reaches maturity? -- Moreover where does additive manufacturing sit within this interdisciplinarity framework? -- Observations -- Some possible solutions? --Proposed solutions? -- A positive conclusion -- Bibliography -- Chapter 5. Questions of Hope and "Unhope" -- The "lab-tribe" (LT) approach -- Context elements -- From Additive Manufacturing to 3D/4D Printing -- Some results -- Scientific excellence" -- Financing and the orientation of research -- Prospective opportunities for the research unit -- Collective projects? Risky projects? -- Creativity's place in research -- Support to creativity? -- But all the same, strong brakes on creativity -- What to do? -- Innovation, a consequence of creativity -- Academic system -- Between productions resulting from science and responsible conscience -- Engagement toward a future focused on innovation? -- Caught between two chairs? Between more than two chairs? -- Innovation as scientific production: is it born of freedom? What freedom? -- What solutions to evoke for additive manufacturing? -- General framing -- And if the history of additive manufacturing in France were examined in light of these comments? -- A bit of creativity? -- In the form of a conclusion: a summary of the author's point of view -- Bibliography -- Conclusion -- Index
Control code
1008962869
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781119437376
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
color illustrations
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
cl0500000956
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1008962869

Library Locations

    • Ellis LibraryBorrow it
      1020 Lowry Street, Columbia, MO, 65201, US
      38.944491 -92.326012
    • Engineering Library & Technology CommonsBorrow it
      W2001 Lafferre Hall, Columbia, MO, 65211, US
      38.946102 -92.330125
Processing Feedback ...