The Resource How do politicians' responses to scandals differ on social media? : an evaluation of three case studies using the contingency theory, Gregory Steven Young

How do politicians' responses to scandals differ on social media? : an evaluation of three case studies using the contingency theory, Gregory Steven Young

Label
How do politicians' responses to scandals differ on social media? : an evaluation of three case studies using the contingency theory
Title
How do politicians' responses to scandals differ on social media?
Title remainder
an evaluation of three case studies using the contingency theory
Statement of responsibility
Gregory Steven Young
Creator
Contributor
Author
Thesis advisor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • This study focused on furthering the research around the contingency theory, developed by Cancel et al. (1997), that focuses on discovering whether the response to the scandal is more accommodative or advocacy-focused. The study furthered this research by measuring whether politicians' responses to sex scandals fall more on the advocacy or accommodative side of the theory. Additionally, this study also focused on whether there was a difference between how a politician responded to a scandal on social media, as compared to their responses on more traditional forms of media, such as press releases or media interviews. In order to accomplish this research, three case studies were reviewed: former Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain's 2011 sexual harassment scandal, former Representative Anthony Weiner's 2010 sex scandal, and former Illinois Republican gubernatorial candidate Dan Rutherford's 2014 sexual harassment scandal. Each scandal was reviewed extensively with a focus on their traditional media and social media responses to the scandal. This included looking at the press releases, media interviews and Twitter pages of the politicians' studied. It was discovered that none of the responses on social media were at all accommodative, as all were advocacy-based responses. Additionally, almost all of the traditional media appearances were advocacy-focused as well, with few exceptions. It was thus concluded that social media is rarely used to make accommodative responses to scandals, due to the difficulty of responding thoroughly to the allegations. Overall, this study helps to provide further depth to the contingency theory and brings more clarity in exactly how politicians respond to scandals
  • Internship: "The work component of my project involved me taking a internship at FleishmanHillard. After being placed on the healthcare team at FH, I worked on a variety of health-related accounts, including pharmaceutical companies like Abbvie and health-related organizations like the Food and Drug Administration. I even received the opportunity to work with private corporations with health-ties, such as the Corn Refiners Association and the American Hematological Society. As part of my internship (and due to my social media experience), I was also placed in the social media analytics team and therefore took on a dual role at the public relations firm. As a part of the social media analytics team, I utilized tools like Sysomos and Radian6 to help clients gauge their presence on social media and identify conversations about their products taking place online. The biggest company in this area was General Motors, as it was about to undergo a recall when it hired FleishmanHillard to do its advertising. As a part of the Washington Program, I also participates in weekly seminars that informed me further about the politics and media. This entailed several visits to people that are extremely relevant to my topic area, including Sen. Claire McCaskill's communication director John LaBombard, lobbyist Terry Bracy, and former White House Press Secretary Mike McCurry. Through these seminars, I gained valuable insight of how the media helps shape and drive the political scene in Washington, D.C." --Page 4
Cataloging source
MUU
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Young, Gregory Steven
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
  • theses
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Cameron, Glen T.
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Weiner, Anthony
  • Cain, Herman
  • Rutherford, Dan
  • Politicians
  • Political corruption
  • Social media
  • Online social networks
  • Journalism
Label
How do politicians' responses to scandals differ on social media? : an evaluation of three case studies using the contingency theory, Gregory Steven Young
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "May 2014."
  • Includes nine files: project report (field notes from internship), analysis (research report), keywords, abstract and supplementary materials (charts and result summaries)
  • Professional project report submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Arts in Journalism from the University of Missouri--Columbia, School of Journalism
  • Committee chair: Dr. Glenn Cameron
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (projectreport.pdf pages 75-85)
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent.
  • rdacontent.
Control code
911058662
Extent
1 online resource (9 files)
Form of item
online
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)911058662
Label
How do politicians' responses to scandals differ on social media? : an evaluation of three case studies using the contingency theory, Gregory Steven Young
Publication
Note
  • "May 2014."
  • Includes nine files: project report (field notes from internship), analysis (research report), keywords, abstract and supplementary materials (charts and result summaries)
  • Professional project report submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Arts in Journalism from the University of Missouri--Columbia, School of Journalism
  • Committee chair: Dr. Glenn Cameron
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (projectreport.pdf pages 75-85)
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent.
  • rdacontent.
Control code
911058662
Extent
1 online resource (9 files)
Form of item
online
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)911058662

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