Coverart for item
The Resource How vertebrates left the water, Michel Laurin

How vertebrates left the water, Michel Laurin

Label
How vertebrates left the water
Title
How vertebrates left the water
Statement of responsibility
Michel Laurin
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
  • eng
  • fre
  • eng
Summary
This usefully illustrated book describes how some finned vertebrates acquired limbs, giving rise to more than 25,000 extant tetrapod species. Michel Laurin uses paleontological geological, physiological, and comparative anatomical data to describe this monumental event
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Laurin, Michel
Dewey number
596.13/8
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
QL607.5
LC item number
L3813 2010eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Vertebrates
  • SCIENCE
  • Vertebrates
  • Wirbeltiere
  • Evolution
  • Wirbeltiere
  • Evolution
Label
How vertebrates left the water, Michel Laurin
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
How can we reconstruct evolutionary history? Classification and biological nomenclature -- Modern phylogenetics -- Homology and analogy : lungs, swim bladders, and gills -- Geological time scale and the chronology of a few key events -- A few relevant paleontological localities -- Conquest of land : data from extant vertebrates. Are animals still conquering the land today? -- The coelacanth, a living fossil? -- Dipnoans : our closest extant finned cousins -- Reproduction among tetrapods : amphibians are not all amphibious! -- Paleontological context. The conquest of land in various taxa -- The history of our ideas about the conquest of land by vertebrates -- The lateral-line organ and the lifestyle of Paleozoic stegocephalians -- Vertebrate limb evolution. The vertebrate skeleton -- Hox genes and the origin of digits -- Sarcopterygian fins and the origin of digits -- Fragmentary fossils, phylogeny, and the first digits -- The gills of Acanthostega and the original function of the tetrapod limb -- Bone microanatomy and lifestyle -- Diversity of Paleozoic stegocephalians. Temnospondyls -- Embolomeres -- Seymouriamorphs -- Amphibians -- Diadectomorphs -- Amniotes -- Stegocephalian phylogeny -- Adaptations to life on land. Limbs and girdles -- Vertebral centrum and axial skeleton -- Breathing -- The skin and water exchange -- Sensory organs -- Synthesis and conclusion. Conquest of land and the first returns to the aquatic environment -- Why come onto land? -- Modern paleontology and the "Indiana Jones" stereotype
Control code
673431014
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xv, 199 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780520947986
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
  • 22573/cttt3dsm
  • f1dfc8a7-93ea-43ed-a92a-5f76f2d95858
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)673431014
Label
How vertebrates left the water, Michel Laurin
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
How can we reconstruct evolutionary history? Classification and biological nomenclature -- Modern phylogenetics -- Homology and analogy : lungs, swim bladders, and gills -- Geological time scale and the chronology of a few key events -- A few relevant paleontological localities -- Conquest of land : data from extant vertebrates. Are animals still conquering the land today? -- The coelacanth, a living fossil? -- Dipnoans : our closest extant finned cousins -- Reproduction among tetrapods : amphibians are not all amphibious! -- Paleontological context. The conquest of land in various taxa -- The history of our ideas about the conquest of land by vertebrates -- The lateral-line organ and the lifestyle of Paleozoic stegocephalians -- Vertebrate limb evolution. The vertebrate skeleton -- Hox genes and the origin of digits -- Sarcopterygian fins and the origin of digits -- Fragmentary fossils, phylogeny, and the first digits -- The gills of Acanthostega and the original function of the tetrapod limb -- Bone microanatomy and lifestyle -- Diversity of Paleozoic stegocephalians. Temnospondyls -- Embolomeres -- Seymouriamorphs -- Amphibians -- Diadectomorphs -- Amniotes -- Stegocephalian phylogeny -- Adaptations to life on land. Limbs and girdles -- Vertebral centrum and axial skeleton -- Breathing -- The skin and water exchange -- Sensory organs -- Synthesis and conclusion. Conquest of land and the first returns to the aquatic environment -- Why come onto land? -- Modern paleontology and the "Indiana Jones" stereotype
Control code
673431014
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xv, 199 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780520947986
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
  • 22573/cttt3dsm
  • f1dfc8a7-93ea-43ed-a92a-5f76f2d95858
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)673431014

Library Locations

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      1020 Lowry Street, Columbia, MO, 65201, US
      38.944491 -92.326012
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