Coverart for item
The Resource Inventing ourselves out of jobs? : America's debate over technological unemployment, 1929-1981, Amy Sue Bix

Inventing ourselves out of jobs? : America's debate over technological unemployment, 1929-1981, Amy Sue Bix

Label
Inventing ourselves out of jobs? : America's debate over technological unemployment, 1929-1981
Title
Inventing ourselves out of jobs?
Title remainder
America's debate over technological unemployment, 1929-1981
Statement of responsibility
Amy Sue Bix
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"Americans today often associate scientific and technological change with national progress and personal well-being. Yet underneath such confident assumptions, serious questions about the direction and social implications of scientific and technological change persist. In Inventing Ourselves Out of Jobs? Amy Sue Bix locates the origins of such conflict in the Great Depression of the 1930s, when the country's social and economic crisis forced many Americans to re-examine ideas about science, technology, and progress."--BOOK JACKET
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Bix, Amy Sue
Dewey number
331.13/7042/0973
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
HD6331.2.U5
LC item number
B59 2000
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
Studies in industry and society
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Technological unemployment
Label
Inventing ourselves out of jobs? : America's debate over technological unemployment, 1929-1981, Amy Sue Bix
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [313]-359) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Prologue : technology as progress? -- "Economy of a madhouse" : Entering the Depression-era debate over technological unemployment -- "Finding jobs faster than invention can take them away" : Government's role in the technological unemployment debate -- 'No power on earth can stop improved machinery" : labor's concern about displacement -- "Machinery don't eat" : displacement as a theme in Depression culture -- "The machine has been libeled" : the business community's defense -- "Innocence or guilt of science" : scientists and engineers mobilize to justify mechanization -- "What will the smug machine age do?" : Envisioning past, present, and future as America moves from Depression to war -- "Automation just killed us" : the displacement question in postwar America -- Epilogue : revisiting the technological unemployment debate
Control code
41548405
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
x, 376 pages
Isbn
9780801862441
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
99032829
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
Label
Inventing ourselves out of jobs? : America's debate over technological unemployment, 1929-1981, Amy Sue Bix
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [313]-359) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Prologue : technology as progress? -- "Economy of a madhouse" : Entering the Depression-era debate over technological unemployment -- "Finding jobs faster than invention can take them away" : Government's role in the technological unemployment debate -- 'No power on earth can stop improved machinery" : labor's concern about displacement -- "Machinery don't eat" : displacement as a theme in Depression culture -- "The machine has been libeled" : the business community's defense -- "Innocence or guilt of science" : scientists and engineers mobilize to justify mechanization -- "What will the smug machine age do?" : Envisioning past, present, and future as America moves from Depression to war -- "Automation just killed us" : the displacement question in postwar America -- Epilogue : revisiting the technological unemployment debate
Control code
41548405
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
x, 376 pages
Isbn
9780801862441
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
99032829
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations

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      38.944491 -92.326012
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