Coverart for item
The Resource Language myths and the history of English, Richard J. Watts

Language myths and the history of English, Richard J. Watts

Label
Language myths and the history of English
Title
Language myths and the history of English
Statement of responsibility
Richard J. Watts
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Watts, Richard J
Dewey number
420.9
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
LC call number
PE1098
LC item number
.W38 2011
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
Oxford studies in sociolinguistics
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • English language
  • English language
  • Sociolinguistics
  • Discourse analysis
Label
Language myths and the history of English, Richard J. Watts
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1. Metaphors, myths, ideologies and archives. -- Defining myths -- Conceptual metaphors and myths -- Language myths and conceptual metaphors -- Foucault's understanding of discourse -- Discourse archives -- Myths are the "stuff that ideologies are made on" -- The structure of the book -- 2. Establishing a linguistic pedigree. -- The fire at Ashburnham House -- The myth of the longevity of English -- Tracing the growth of interest in the Beowulf manuscript -- The dating of Beowulf -- Kiernan's arguments -- Sociolinguistic arguments in favour of Danelaw provenance for Beowulf -- Switching discourse archives -- 3. Breaking the unbroken tradition. -- LInking two myths -- Metapragmatic and metadiscursive linguistic expressions and their significance in inscribed orality -- The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles and the archive they instantiated -- The breakdown of the archive and inscribed orality -- The disappearance of the ASC: the end of a discourse archive -- 4. The construction of a modern myth: Middle English as a creole. -- The creolisation hypothesis -- The discussion thread "Is English a creole?" -- The "Middle English is a creole" debate in the academic literature -- All language is language in contact -- Simplification processes not resulting in creole -- Creolisation or no creolisation? -- 5. Barbarians and others. -- The nation-state and the notion of Kultursprache -- Language versus a language versus the language -- The "other" chronicle tradition -- Myths in the Polychronicon -- Linking up and extending the myths -- The central nexus of language myths -- 6. The myth of "greatness." -- Introduction -- Dating the GVS -- A reappaisal of research work on an elusive phenomenon -- GVS disputes -- Challenging the GVS -- Sociolinguistic aspects of the GVS -- The myths of greatness reconsidered --
  • 7. Reinterpreting Swift's A proposal for correcting, improving an ascertaining the English tongue: challenging an embryonic modern myth. -- Potential new myths -- The "ideology of the standard language" and the complaint tradtion -- Swift's Proposal as the beginning of a complaint tradition -- Contextualising the Proposal sociohistorically -- Alternative readings of Swifts's Proposal -- Swift and after -- 8. Polishing the myths: the commercial side of politeness. -- The obsession with politeness -- The origins of eighteenth-century politeness -- The honnête homme and Descarte's physiological metaphor -- Gentrifying philosophy -- Commercialising the myth of the polite language -- Postscript -- 9. Challenging the hegemony of standard English. -- "Polite English" and social stratification at the end of the eighteenth century -- Radicals, revolutionaries and language -- Language and working-class movements at the beginning of the nineteenth century -- William Hone, Peterloo and the Chartist movement -- From the legitimate language to the standard language -- 10. Transforming a myth to save an archive: when polite becomes educated. -- From homo socialis to homo culturalis -- Language and politeness, language and "educatedness" -- Comprehensive schools and the teaching of standard English -- Planning the reintroduction of grammar into the National Curriculum -- John Honey and the notion of educatedness -- What is standard English? -- 11. Commodifying English and constructing a new myth. -- The emergence of a modern myth -- English-"the language of the world"? -- The commodification of English -- The price of English in Switzerland -- Problems in the assumption that English is the global language -- 12. Myths, ideologies of English and funnel view of the history of English. -- From conceptual metaphors to discourse archives: the function of the myth -- The funnel view of the history of English -- Myths as stories -- Establishing the "superiority" of English -- Linguistic homogeneity versus linguistic heterogeneity
Control code
609102621
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xiv, 338 pages
Isbn
9780195327601
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2010016760
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations, map
System control number
(OCoLC)609102621
Label
Language myths and the history of English, Richard J. Watts
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1. Metaphors, myths, ideologies and archives. -- Defining myths -- Conceptual metaphors and myths -- Language myths and conceptual metaphors -- Foucault's understanding of discourse -- Discourse archives -- Myths are the "stuff that ideologies are made on" -- The structure of the book -- 2. Establishing a linguistic pedigree. -- The fire at Ashburnham House -- The myth of the longevity of English -- Tracing the growth of interest in the Beowulf manuscript -- The dating of Beowulf -- Kiernan's arguments -- Sociolinguistic arguments in favour of Danelaw provenance for Beowulf -- Switching discourse archives -- 3. Breaking the unbroken tradition. -- LInking two myths -- Metapragmatic and metadiscursive linguistic expressions and their significance in inscribed orality -- The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles and the archive they instantiated -- The breakdown of the archive and inscribed orality -- The disappearance of the ASC: the end of a discourse archive -- 4. The construction of a modern myth: Middle English as a creole. -- The creolisation hypothesis -- The discussion thread "Is English a creole?" -- The "Middle English is a creole" debate in the academic literature -- All language is language in contact -- Simplification processes not resulting in creole -- Creolisation or no creolisation? -- 5. Barbarians and others. -- The nation-state and the notion of Kultursprache -- Language versus a language versus the language -- The "other" chronicle tradition -- Myths in the Polychronicon -- Linking up and extending the myths -- The central nexus of language myths -- 6. The myth of "greatness." -- Introduction -- Dating the GVS -- A reappaisal of research work on an elusive phenomenon -- GVS disputes -- Challenging the GVS -- Sociolinguistic aspects of the GVS -- The myths of greatness reconsidered --
  • 7. Reinterpreting Swift's A proposal for correcting, improving an ascertaining the English tongue: challenging an embryonic modern myth. -- Potential new myths -- The "ideology of the standard language" and the complaint tradtion -- Swift's Proposal as the beginning of a complaint tradition -- Contextualising the Proposal sociohistorically -- Alternative readings of Swifts's Proposal -- Swift and after -- 8. Polishing the myths: the commercial side of politeness. -- The obsession with politeness -- The origins of eighteenth-century politeness -- The honnête homme and Descarte's physiological metaphor -- Gentrifying philosophy -- Commercialising the myth of the polite language -- Postscript -- 9. Challenging the hegemony of standard English. -- "Polite English" and social stratification at the end of the eighteenth century -- Radicals, revolutionaries and language -- Language and working-class movements at the beginning of the nineteenth century -- William Hone, Peterloo and the Chartist movement -- From the legitimate language to the standard language -- 10. Transforming a myth to save an archive: when polite becomes educated. -- From homo socialis to homo culturalis -- Language and politeness, language and "educatedness" -- Comprehensive schools and the teaching of standard English -- Planning the reintroduction of grammar into the National Curriculum -- John Honey and the notion of educatedness -- What is standard English? -- 11. Commodifying English and constructing a new myth. -- The emergence of a modern myth -- English-"the language of the world"? -- The commodification of English -- The price of English in Switzerland -- Problems in the assumption that English is the global language -- 12. Myths, ideologies of English and funnel view of the history of English. -- From conceptual metaphors to discourse archives: the function of the myth -- The funnel view of the history of English -- Myths as stories -- Establishing the "superiority" of English -- Linguistic homogeneity versus linguistic heterogeneity
Control code
609102621
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xiv, 338 pages
Isbn
9780195327601
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2010016760
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations, map
System control number
(OCoLC)609102621

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