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The Resource Life of John Bunyan, by Edmund Venables

Life of John Bunyan, by Edmund Venables

Label
Life of John Bunyan
Title
Life of John Bunyan
Statement of responsibility
by Edmund Venables
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Biography type
individual biography
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1819-1895
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Venables, Edmund
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1841-1925
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Anderson, John Parker
Series statement
"Great writers"
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Bunyan, John
  • Authors
Label
Life of John Bunyan, by Edmund Venables
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Bibliography, by John P. Anderson: xxxv pages at end
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Bunyan born at Elstow in Bedfordshire in the latter part of the year 1628; that year a momentous year; the boy's parentage and ancestry; Elstow, and its church; the parents poor but worthy people; Bunyan's education; to what extent his self-accusations must be accepted literally; his sense of sin, and spiritual terrors; his religious feelings deepened by providential escapes; he serves in the army; probably in the Parliament side; resumes work as a tinker; his father did not die till the early part of 1676 -- Bunyan marries his first wife; a godly woman; her two religious books; she effects a religious change in him; he becomes an assiduous church-goer; Sunday sports in the village; Bunyan convinced of their unlawfulness; conflict in his mind; his self-satisfaction shaken by the conversation of three or four godly women; despair; comforted by a dream of vision; is introduced to Mr Gifford; further inward struggles; is tempted to deny Christ; complies; suffers grievous spiritual torments; is at last delivered -- Bunyan becomes a member of Mr. Gifford's congregation; his spiritual torments had nearly ruined his health; his two daughters born, one in 1650, an one in 1654; laves Elstow, and settles in Bedford; his wife dies; begins to preach; at first modestly; then with growing fame; is still subject to his old spiritual fears; converts a "Cambridge scholar;" greater opposition roused against him; is threatened with an indictment for his preaching in March, 1658; he disputes openly with the Quakers, and publishes against them his first book; its character; Burrough publishes a reply; Bunyan rejoins; publishes his third book in 1658; and his fourth in May, 1659 -- Bunyan's probable feelings at the Restoration; Charles II.'s "Declaration from Breda," reaction against Puritanism; a warrant issued for Bunyan's apprehension in November, 1660; he refuses to seek safety by flight; is taken before Mr Wingate; refuses to give up preaching; is taken to Bedford gaol -- Place of Bunyan's imprisonment; to what extent such imprisonment severe; his friends try to get him bailed out; early in January, 1661, he is tried at the quarter sessions; the chairman, Sir John Keeling; Bunyan undoubtedly guilty as the law stood; he refuses to amend; the clerk of the peace sent to reason with him; but fails; the Coronation in April, 1661, affords a prospect of release; his wife goes to London to appeal to the House of Lords; the matter brought before the judges at the next assizes in August; his wife three times presents her husband's appeal for a hearing to the judges, Twisden and Sir Matthew Hale; the latter explains that they can do nothing for her; at the next assizes, in January, 1662, Bunyan makes further vain efforts to obtain a hearing; is not released till the 17th of May 1572 --Character of Bunyan's imprisonment; at first has some liberty; soon this is withdrawn; melancholy feelings and forebodings in prison; in order to support his wife and family he makes "long-tagged laces;" he preaches in prison; studies his limited library, the Bible and Foxe's "Book of Martyrs;" prison life becomes more endurable; he is released for a short time in 1666; his pen less prolific during second term of his imprisonment; and does not recover its copiousness till his final release; treated with less severity; the Quakers mainly instrumental in obtaining relaxation of the penal laws; Bunyan reaps the advantage of the Declaration of Indulgence; he is licensed to preach on the 9th of May, 1672; for months afterwards is formally pardoned. -- Bunyan had written much during the earlier half of his imprisonment; his character and works as a poet; quality of his verse; his prose works, "Grace Abounding," "Praying in the Spirit," and "Christian Behavior;" special importance of the "Grace Abounding;" "Defence of the Doctrine of Justification by Faith" -- Bunyan pardoned under Great Seal, Sept 13, 1672; comparatively little known of remaining years of his life; those years full of work; he does not abandon his calling as a "brazier"; his celebrity as a preacher; he refuses to leave Bedford for London; minor troubles with his congregation; renewed imprisonment in 1675; released owing to good offices of Owen, formerly Cromwell's chaplain; during this imprisonment writes "The Pilgrim's Progress"; first part published in 1678; second part in 1685; between the two, the "Life and Death of Mr. Badman," and "The Holy War"; threatened persecution in 1685; Bunyan not to be cajoled by James II.'s government; his last days and last works; rejects all worldly advancement; gets wet through when on a mission of kindness; is stricken with mortal illness; dies on August 31, 1688; buried in Bunhill Field; his wife; his personal appearance; his preaching; his character -- Bunyan's character as a writer; his naturalness; earnestness; style; imaginative power; reality of his characters; all drawn from the life; "The Pilgrim's Progress"; may be regarded as a novel; Bunyan really the first English novelist; secret of the books universal acceptance; the "second part' inferior the the first; "The Holy War"; an attempt to realize the impossible; necessarily inconclusive; "The Live and Death of Mr. Badman"; not rally an allegory at all, but a tale; to be taken as a picture of vulgar English life in Bunyan's days
Control code
1931696
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
195, xxxv pages
Lccn
12039693
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
(WaOLN)818535
Label
Life of John Bunyan, by Edmund Venables
Publication
Bibliography note
Bibliography, by John P. Anderson: xxxv pages at end
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Bunyan born at Elstow in Bedfordshire in the latter part of the year 1628; that year a momentous year; the boy's parentage and ancestry; Elstow, and its church; the parents poor but worthy people; Bunyan's education; to what extent his self-accusations must be accepted literally; his sense of sin, and spiritual terrors; his religious feelings deepened by providential escapes; he serves in the army; probably in the Parliament side; resumes work as a tinker; his father did not die till the early part of 1676 -- Bunyan marries his first wife; a godly woman; her two religious books; she effects a religious change in him; he becomes an assiduous church-goer; Sunday sports in the village; Bunyan convinced of their unlawfulness; conflict in his mind; his self-satisfaction shaken by the conversation of three or four godly women; despair; comforted by a dream of vision; is introduced to Mr Gifford; further inward struggles; is tempted to deny Christ; complies; suffers grievous spiritual torments; is at last delivered -- Bunyan becomes a member of Mr. Gifford's congregation; his spiritual torments had nearly ruined his health; his two daughters born, one in 1650, an one in 1654; laves Elstow, and settles in Bedford; his wife dies; begins to preach; at first modestly; then with growing fame; is still subject to his old spiritual fears; converts a "Cambridge scholar;" greater opposition roused against him; is threatened with an indictment for his preaching in March, 1658; he disputes openly with the Quakers, and publishes against them his first book; its character; Burrough publishes a reply; Bunyan rejoins; publishes his third book in 1658; and his fourth in May, 1659 -- Bunyan's probable feelings at the Restoration; Charles II.'s "Declaration from Breda," reaction against Puritanism; a warrant issued for Bunyan's apprehension in November, 1660; he refuses to seek safety by flight; is taken before Mr Wingate; refuses to give up preaching; is taken to Bedford gaol -- Place of Bunyan's imprisonment; to what extent such imprisonment severe; his friends try to get him bailed out; early in January, 1661, he is tried at the quarter sessions; the chairman, Sir John Keeling; Bunyan undoubtedly guilty as the law stood; he refuses to amend; the clerk of the peace sent to reason with him; but fails; the Coronation in April, 1661, affords a prospect of release; his wife goes to London to appeal to the House of Lords; the matter brought before the judges at the next assizes in August; his wife three times presents her husband's appeal for a hearing to the judges, Twisden and Sir Matthew Hale; the latter explains that they can do nothing for her; at the next assizes, in January, 1662, Bunyan makes further vain efforts to obtain a hearing; is not released till the 17th of May 1572 --Character of Bunyan's imprisonment; at first has some liberty; soon this is withdrawn; melancholy feelings and forebodings in prison; in order to support his wife and family he makes "long-tagged laces;" he preaches in prison; studies his limited library, the Bible and Foxe's "Book of Martyrs;" prison life becomes more endurable; he is released for a short time in 1666; his pen less prolific during second term of his imprisonment; and does not recover its copiousness till his final release; treated with less severity; the Quakers mainly instrumental in obtaining relaxation of the penal laws; Bunyan reaps the advantage of the Declaration of Indulgence; he is licensed to preach on the 9th of May, 1672; for months afterwards is formally pardoned. -- Bunyan had written much during the earlier half of his imprisonment; his character and works as a poet; quality of his verse; his prose works, "Grace Abounding," "Praying in the Spirit," and "Christian Behavior;" special importance of the "Grace Abounding;" "Defence of the Doctrine of Justification by Faith" -- Bunyan pardoned under Great Seal, Sept 13, 1672; comparatively little known of remaining years of his life; those years full of work; he does not abandon his calling as a "brazier"; his celebrity as a preacher; he refuses to leave Bedford for London; minor troubles with his congregation; renewed imprisonment in 1675; released owing to good offices of Owen, formerly Cromwell's chaplain; during this imprisonment writes "The Pilgrim's Progress"; first part published in 1678; second part in 1685; between the two, the "Life and Death of Mr. Badman," and "The Holy War"; threatened persecution in 1685; Bunyan not to be cajoled by James II.'s government; his last days and last works; rejects all worldly advancement; gets wet through when on a mission of kindness; is stricken with mortal illness; dies on August 31, 1688; buried in Bunhill Field; his wife; his personal appearance; his preaching; his character -- Bunyan's character as a writer; his naturalness; earnestness; style; imaginative power; reality of his characters; all drawn from the life; "The Pilgrim's Progress"; may be regarded as a novel; Bunyan really the first English novelist; secret of the books universal acceptance; the "second part' inferior the the first; "The Holy War"; an attempt to realize the impossible; necessarily inconclusive; "The Live and Death of Mr. Badman"; not rally an allegory at all, but a tale; to be taken as a picture of vulgar English life in Bunyan's days
Control code
1931696
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
195, xxxv pages
Lccn
12039693
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
(WaOLN)818535

Library Locations

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