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The Resource Literature and nation in the sixteenth century : inventing Renaissance France, Timothy Hampton

Literature and nation in the sixteenth century : inventing Renaissance France, Timothy Hampton

Label
Literature and nation in the sixteenth century : inventing Renaissance France
Title
Literature and nation in the sixteenth century
Title remainder
inventing Renaissance France
Statement of responsibility
Timothy Hampton
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • "Assessing the relationship between the emergence of modern French literary culture and the ideological debates that marked Renaissance France, Timothy Hampton explores the role of literary form in shaping national identity."
  • "The foundational texts of modern French literature were produced during a period of unprecedented struggle over the meaning of community. In the face of religious heresy, political threats from abroad, and new forms of cultural diversity, Renaissance French culture confronted, in new and urgent ways, the question of what it means to be "French." Hampton shows how conflicts between different concepts of community were mediated symbolically through the genesis of new literary forms
  • Hampton's analysis of works by Rabelais, Montaigne, Du Bellay, and Marguerite de Navarre, as well as writings by lesser-known poets, pamphleteers, and political philosophers, shows that the vulnerability of France and the instability of French identity were pervasive cultural themes during this period."
  • "Contemporary scholarship on nation-building in early modern Europe has emphasized the importance of centralized power and the rise of absolute monarchy. Hampton offers a counterargument, demonstrating that both community and national identity in Renaissance France were defined through a dialogic relationship to that which was not French - to the foreigner, the stranger, the intruder from abroad. He provides both a methodological challenge to traditional cultural history and a new consideration of the role of literature in the definition of the nation."--Jacket
  • Assessing the relationship between the emergence of modern French literary culture and the ideological debates that marked Renaissance France, Timothy Hampton explores the role of literary form in shaping national identity. The foundational texts of modern French literature were produced during a period of unprecedented struggle over the meaning of community. In the face of religious heresy, political threats from abroad, and new forms of cultural diversity, Renaissance French culture confronted, in new and urgent ways, the question of what it means to be "French." Hampton shows how conflicts between different concepts of community were mediated symbolically through the genesis of new literary forms. Hampton's analysis of works by Rabelais, Montaigne, Du Bellay, and Marguerite de Navarre, as well as writings by lesser-known poets, pamphleteers, and political philosophers, shows that the vulnerability of France and the instability of French identity were pervasive cultural themes during this period. Contemporary scholarship on nation-building in early modern Europe has emphasized the importance of centralized power and the rise of absolute monarchy. Hampton offers a counterargument, demonstrating that both community and national identity in Renaissance France were defined through a dialogic relationship to that which was not French - to the foreigner, the stranger, the intruder from abroad. He provides both a methodological challenge to traditional cultural history and a new consideration of the role of literature in the definition of the nation
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hampton, Timothy
Dewey number
840.9/358
Index
index present
LC call number
PQ239
LC item number
.H26 2001
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • French literature
  • Nationalism in literature
Label
Literature and nation in the sixteenth century : inventing Renaissance France, Timothy Hampton
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 269-282) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Garden of letters : toward a theory of literary nationhood -- The limits of ideology : Rabelais and the edge of Christendom -- Nation and utopia in the 1530s : the case of Rabelais's Gargantua -- Narrative form and national space : textual geography from the Heptaméron to La princesse de Cléves -- Representing France at mid-century : Du Bellay and the lyric invention of national character -- History, alterity, and the European subject in Montaigne's Essais -- Pauline's dream
Control code
44585950
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xvi, 289 pages
Isbn
9780801437748
Lccn
00010240
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Label
Literature and nation in the sixteenth century : inventing Renaissance France, Timothy Hampton
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 269-282) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Garden of letters : toward a theory of literary nationhood -- The limits of ideology : Rabelais and the edge of Christendom -- Nation and utopia in the 1530s : the case of Rabelais's Gargantua -- Narrative form and national space : textual geography from the Heptaméron to La princesse de Cléves -- Representing France at mid-century : Du Bellay and the lyric invention of national character -- History, alterity, and the European subject in Montaigne's Essais -- Pauline's dream
Control code
44585950
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xvi, 289 pages
Isbn
9780801437748
Lccn
00010240
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n

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