Coverart for item
The Resource Markets without limits : moral virtues and commercial interests, Jason Brennan and Peter M. Jaworski

Markets without limits : moral virtues and commercial interests, Jason Brennan and Peter M. Jaworski

Label
Markets without limits : moral virtues and commercial interests
Title
Markets without limits
Title remainder
moral virtues and commercial interests
Statement of responsibility
Jason Brennan and Peter M. Jaworski
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
May you sell your vote? May you sell your kidney? May gay men pay surrogates to bear them children? May spouses pay each other to watch the kids, do the dishes, or have sex? Should we allow the rich to genetically engineer gifted, beautiful children? Should we allow betting markets on terrorist attacks and natural disasters? Most people shudder at the thought. To put some goods and services for sale offends human dignity. If everything is commodified, then nothing is scared. The market corrodes our character. Or so most people say. In Markets without Limits, Jason Brennan and Peter M. Jaworski give markets a fair hearing. The market does not introduce wrongness where there was none previously. Thus, the authors claim, the question of what rightfully may be bought and sold has a simple answer: if you may do it for free, you may do it for money. Contrary to the conservative consensus, they claim there are no inherent limits to what can be bought and sold, but only restrictions on how we buy and sell. -- Back cover
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1979-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Brennan, Jason
Dewey number
174/.4
Index
index present
LC call number
HB72
LC item number
.M24725 2016
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Jaworski, Peter
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Exchange
  • Economics
  • Value
  • Markets
  • Wirtschaftsethik
  • Mercato
Label
Markets without limits : moral virtues and commercial interests, Jason Brennan and Peter M. Jaworski
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 228-235) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Part I. Should everything be for sale? -- 1. Are there some things money should not buy? -- 2. If you may do it for free, you may do it for money -- 3. What the commodification debate is and is not about -- 4. It's the how, not the what -- Part II. Do markets signal disrespect? -- 5. Semiotic objections -- 6. The mere commodity objection -- 7. The wrong signal and wrong currency objections -- 8. Objections: semiotic essentialism and minding our manners -- Part III. Do markets corrupt? -- 9. The corruption objection -- 10. How to make a sound corruption objection -- 11. The selfishness objection -- 12. The crowding out objection -- 13. The immoral preference objection -- 14. The low quality objection -- 15. The civics objection -- Part IV. Exploitation, harm to self, and misallocation -- 16. Essential and incidental objections -- 17. Line up for expensive equality! -- 18. Baby buying -- 19. Vote selling -- Part V. Debunking institutions -- 20. Anti-market attitudes are resilient -- 21. Where do anti-market attitudes come from? -- 22. The pseudo-morality of disgust -- 23. Postscript
Control code
906027823
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xi, 239 pages
Isbn
9780415737357
Isbn Type
(pbk)
Lccn
2015008148
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other control number
12391892
System control number
(OCoLC)906027823
Label
Markets without limits : moral virtues and commercial interests, Jason Brennan and Peter M. Jaworski
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 228-235) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Part I. Should everything be for sale? -- 1. Are there some things money should not buy? -- 2. If you may do it for free, you may do it for money -- 3. What the commodification debate is and is not about -- 4. It's the how, not the what -- Part II. Do markets signal disrespect? -- 5. Semiotic objections -- 6. The mere commodity objection -- 7. The wrong signal and wrong currency objections -- 8. Objections: semiotic essentialism and minding our manners -- Part III. Do markets corrupt? -- 9. The corruption objection -- 10. How to make a sound corruption objection -- 11. The selfishness objection -- 12. The crowding out objection -- 13. The immoral preference objection -- 14. The low quality objection -- 15. The civics objection -- Part IV. Exploitation, harm to self, and misallocation -- 16. Essential and incidental objections -- 17. Line up for expensive equality! -- 18. Baby buying -- 19. Vote selling -- Part V. Debunking institutions -- 20. Anti-market attitudes are resilient -- 21. Where do anti-market attitudes come from? -- 22. The pseudo-morality of disgust -- 23. Postscript
Control code
906027823
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xi, 239 pages
Isbn
9780415737357
Isbn Type
(pbk)
Lccn
2015008148
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other control number
12391892
System control number
(OCoLC)906027823

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