Coverart for item
The Resource Medicine and Shakespeare in the English Renaissance, F. David Hoeniger

Medicine and Shakespeare in the English Renaissance, F. David Hoeniger

Label
Medicine and Shakespeare in the English Renaissance
Title
Medicine and Shakespeare in the English Renaissance
Statement of responsibility
F. David Hoeniger
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
What precisely does Falstaff mean when he speaks of "inland petty spirits" in his monologue on the advantages of alcohol (sack) in Henry IV Part 2? What does Lear mean when he exclaims, "hysterica passio ... down, thou climbing sorrow"? What were the associations likely evoked by Parolles' reference to the artists "both of Galen and Paracelsus," when All's Well That Ends Well was first staged around 1604, and how did Shakespeare's audience respond to the play's story of the cure of the French king's fistula by a woman? Medicine and Shakespeare in the English Renaissance attempts to answer these and many other questions that episodes and passages in Shakespeare raise. Although designed for students of the literature, history, and thought of Elizabethan and Jacobean England, the book appeals to all who are fascinated by Shakespeare. Unlike enthusiastic treatments by doctors of Shakespeare's knowledge of medicine, it is the work of a scholar specializing in Elizabethan drama who, guided by medical historians, has ventured into an interdisciplinary field. Several chapters describe the background of various theoretical and practical aspects of medicine with which Shakespeare's educated contemporaries were familiar. How did they think about the body with its physiological processes and their relation to mind and soul? How were health and various diseases understood? How were the sick treated, where, and by what kinds of people? What were the chief methods of treatment and what was the rationale for them? What kinds of literature provided ordinary literate Elizabethan men and women with useful medical information? How much controversy was there in medical thought and practice? Yet the book's central focus remains on Shakespeare. While much of the background has its own interest, the exposition seldom continues for long without quotations from Shakespeare or a fellow poet or dramatist to illustrate a concept or detail, or that in the context invite explication. Episodes and longer speeches from several plays receive detailed attention, and the book concludes with reinterpretations of large parts of two plays, All's Well That Ends Well and King Lear. A useful feature is an index to the numerous Shakespearean passages
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hoeniger, F. David
Dewey number
822.3/3
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Index
index present
LC call number
PR3062
LC item number
.H6 1992
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
NLM call number
WZ 330
NLM item number
H694m 1992
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Shakespeare, William
  • Medicine
  • Medicine
  • Literature and medicine
  • Literature and medicine
  • Medicine in literature
  • Renaissance
  • Medicine in Literature
  • Medizin
  • Geschichte (1500-1640)
  • Drama
  • Medizin (Motiv)
  • Geschichte 1550-1650
  • Geschichte (1550-1620)
  • England
Label
Medicine and Shakespeare in the English Renaissance, F. David Hoeniger
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 375-386) and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
pt. I: Medicine and Medical Practitioners in the Age of Shakespeare. 1: Medical Practitioners in Shakespeare's Time: Physicians, Surgeons, Lay-Women, and Others. 2: How Did Shakespeare Gain His Medical Knowledge? With a Survey of Sixteenth-Century Books in English on Medicine and Related Subjects. 3: Doctors in Shakespearean and Other Plays -- pt. II: Major Medical Philosophies and Systems. 4: Galenic Medicine: A Brief History of Its Authority up to the Age of Shakespeare. 5: Basic Tenets of Galenic Medicine. 6: Paracelsian Medicine and Shakespeare -- pt. III: Physiology and Psychology: The Body and How It Functions. 7: Different Traditions Concerning the Role of the Brain and the Heart, and Their Imagery. 8: Galen on the Digestive and Vascular Systems, the Liver, and the Heart. 9: The Brain, Nerves, Senses, and Inward Wits in Galen and Later. 10: The Passions and the Body -- pt. IV: Pathology, Diagnosis, and Therapy. 11: Healing and Disease. 12: Magical Versus Natural Causes of Certain Diseases. 13: Diseases Referred to in Shakespeare's Plays. 14: Common Methods of Diagnosis. 15: Means of Therapy -- pt. V: Three Shakespearean Plays Examined in the Light of Literary and Medical Traditions. 16: The Royal Cure of Scrofula or the King's Evil in Macbeth and in Shakespeare's Time. 17: The She-Doctor and the Miraculous Cure of the King's Fistula in All's Well That Ends Well. 18: The Development of Lear's Madness
Control code
22488445
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
404 pages
Isbn
9780874134254
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
90050400
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(WaOLN)1411436
Label
Medicine and Shakespeare in the English Renaissance, F. David Hoeniger
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 375-386) and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
pt. I: Medicine and Medical Practitioners in the Age of Shakespeare. 1: Medical Practitioners in Shakespeare's Time: Physicians, Surgeons, Lay-Women, and Others. 2: How Did Shakespeare Gain His Medical Knowledge? With a Survey of Sixteenth-Century Books in English on Medicine and Related Subjects. 3: Doctors in Shakespearean and Other Plays -- pt. II: Major Medical Philosophies and Systems. 4: Galenic Medicine: A Brief History of Its Authority up to the Age of Shakespeare. 5: Basic Tenets of Galenic Medicine. 6: Paracelsian Medicine and Shakespeare -- pt. III: Physiology and Psychology: The Body and How It Functions. 7: Different Traditions Concerning the Role of the Brain and the Heart, and Their Imagery. 8: Galen on the Digestive and Vascular Systems, the Liver, and the Heart. 9: The Brain, Nerves, Senses, and Inward Wits in Galen and Later. 10: The Passions and the Body -- pt. IV: Pathology, Diagnosis, and Therapy. 11: Healing and Disease. 12: Magical Versus Natural Causes of Certain Diseases. 13: Diseases Referred to in Shakespeare's Plays. 14: Common Methods of Diagnosis. 15: Means of Therapy -- pt. V: Three Shakespearean Plays Examined in the Light of Literary and Medical Traditions. 16: The Royal Cure of Scrofula or the King's Evil in Macbeth and in Shakespeare's Time. 17: The She-Doctor and the Miraculous Cure of the King's Fistula in All's Well That Ends Well. 18: The Development of Lear's Madness
Control code
22488445
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
404 pages
Isbn
9780874134254
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
90050400
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(WaOLN)1411436

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