Coverart for item
The Resource Mind, society and behavior, the World Bank

Mind, society and behavior, the World Bank

Label
Mind, society and behavior
Title
Mind, society and behavior
Statement of responsibility
the World Bank
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Development economics and policy are due for a redesign. In the past few decades, research from across the natural and social sciences has provided stunning insight into the way people think and make decisions. Whereas the first generation of development policy was based on the assumption that humans make decisions deliberatively and independently, and on the basis of consistent and self-interested preferences, recent research shows that decision making rarely proceeds this way. People think automatically: when deciding, they usually draw on what comes to mind effortlessly. People also think s
Member of
Cataloging source
Nz
Dewey number
338.9
Government publication
international or intergovernmental publication
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Language note
English
LC call number
HD75
LC item number
M563 2014
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
World Bank
Series statement
World development report
Series volume
2015
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Economic development
  • Economic development
  • Economic development
  • Human behavior
  • Economic development
  • Economic development
  • Economic development
  • Human behavior
  • Entwicklungsökonomie
  • Entwicklungspolitik
Label
Mind, society and behavior, the World Bank
Instantiates
Publication
Production
Copyright
Note
  • "A World Bank Group flagship report."
  • "This Report was prepared by a team led by Karla Hoff and Varun Gauri and comprising Sheheryar Banuri, Stephen Commins, Allison Demeritt, Anna Fruttero, Alaka Holla, and Ryan Muldoon, with additional contributions from Elisabeth Beasley, Saugato Datta, Anne Fernald, Emanuela Galasso, Kenneth Leonard, Dhushyanth Raju, Stefan Trautmann, Michael Woolcock, and Bilal Zia. Research analysts Scott Abrahams, Hannah Behrendt, Amy Packard Corenswet, Adam Khorakiwala, Nandita Krishnaswamy, Sana Rafiq, Pauline Rouyer, James Walsh, and Nan Zhou completed the team. The work was carried out under the general direction of Kaushik Basu and Indermit Gill."--Acknowledgments
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
black and white
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Overview: Human decision making and development policy; Three principles of human decision making; Boxes; 0.1 The evolution of thinking in economics about human decision making; Tables; 0.1 6 People have two systems of thinking; Figures; 0.1 Automatic thinking gives us a partial view of the world; 0.2 Reframing decisions can improve welfare: The case of payday borrowing; 0.3 What others think, expect, and do influences our preferences and decisions
  • 0.4 In experimental situations, most people behave as conditional cooperators rather than free riders0.5 Thinking draws on mental models; 0.6 Cuing a stigmatized or entitled identity can affect students' performance; Psychological and social perspectives on policy; 0.2 13 Examples of highly cost-effective behavioral interventions; 0.7 There is greater variation across countries in cognitive caregiving than in socioemotional caregiving; 0.8 Clarifying a form can help borrowers find a better loan product; The work of development professionals; References
  • 0.9 Understanding behavior and identifying effective interventions are complex and iterative processesPart 1: An expanded understanding of human behavior for economic development: A conceptual framework; Introduction; Chapter 1: Thinking automatically; Two systems of thinking; 1.1 27 People have two systems of thinking; 1.1 Framing affects what we pay attention to and how we interpret it; Biases in assessing information; 1.2 A more behavioral model of decision making expands the standard economic model; 1.3 Reframing decisions can improve welfare: The case of payday borrowing
  • Biases in assessing value1.4 Clarifying a form can help borrowers find a better loan product; 1.5 A small change in the college application process had a huge impact on college attendance; Choice architecture; Overcoming intention-action divides; 1.6 Simplifying voting procedures in Brazil is having positive welfare effects on the poor across generations; Conclusion; Notes; References; Chapter 2: Thinking socially; Social preferences and their implications; 2.1 What others think, expect, and do influences our own preferences and decisions
  • 2.2 Children and young adults most affected by war are more likely to favor members of their own group2.3 Opportunities to punish free riding increase cooperation; 2.4 In experimental situations, most people behave as conditional cooperators rather than free riders; The influence of social networks on individual decision making; 2.5 The power of social monitoring: Pictures of eyes increased contributions to a beverage honor bar; The role of social norms in individual decision making; 2.6 Stickers placed in Kenyan minibuses reduced traffic accidents; Conclusion; Notes; References
Control code
898196469
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xvii, 215 pages)
File format
one file format
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781464803437
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations (some colour)
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)898196469
Label
Mind, society and behavior, the World Bank
Publication
Production
Copyright
Note
  • "A World Bank Group flagship report."
  • "This Report was prepared by a team led by Karla Hoff and Varun Gauri and comprising Sheheryar Banuri, Stephen Commins, Allison Demeritt, Anna Fruttero, Alaka Holla, and Ryan Muldoon, with additional contributions from Elisabeth Beasley, Saugato Datta, Anne Fernald, Emanuela Galasso, Kenneth Leonard, Dhushyanth Raju, Stefan Trautmann, Michael Woolcock, and Bilal Zia. Research analysts Scott Abrahams, Hannah Behrendt, Amy Packard Corenswet, Adam Khorakiwala, Nandita Krishnaswamy, Sana Rafiq, Pauline Rouyer, James Walsh, and Nan Zhou completed the team. The work was carried out under the general direction of Kaushik Basu and Indermit Gill."--Acknowledgments
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
black and white
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Overview: Human decision making and development policy; Three principles of human decision making; Boxes; 0.1 The evolution of thinking in economics about human decision making; Tables; 0.1 6 People have two systems of thinking; Figures; 0.1 Automatic thinking gives us a partial view of the world; 0.2 Reframing decisions can improve welfare: The case of payday borrowing; 0.3 What others think, expect, and do influences our preferences and decisions
  • 0.4 In experimental situations, most people behave as conditional cooperators rather than free riders0.5 Thinking draws on mental models; 0.6 Cuing a stigmatized or entitled identity can affect students' performance; Psychological and social perspectives on policy; 0.2 13 Examples of highly cost-effective behavioral interventions; 0.7 There is greater variation across countries in cognitive caregiving than in socioemotional caregiving; 0.8 Clarifying a form can help borrowers find a better loan product; The work of development professionals; References
  • 0.9 Understanding behavior and identifying effective interventions are complex and iterative processesPart 1: An expanded understanding of human behavior for economic development: A conceptual framework; Introduction; Chapter 1: Thinking automatically; Two systems of thinking; 1.1 27 People have two systems of thinking; 1.1 Framing affects what we pay attention to and how we interpret it; Biases in assessing information; 1.2 A more behavioral model of decision making expands the standard economic model; 1.3 Reframing decisions can improve welfare: The case of payday borrowing
  • Biases in assessing value1.4 Clarifying a form can help borrowers find a better loan product; 1.5 A small change in the college application process had a huge impact on college attendance; Choice architecture; Overcoming intention-action divides; 1.6 Simplifying voting procedures in Brazil is having positive welfare effects on the poor across generations; Conclusion; Notes; References; Chapter 2: Thinking socially; Social preferences and their implications; 2.1 What others think, expect, and do influences our own preferences and decisions
  • 2.2 Children and young adults most affected by war are more likely to favor members of their own group2.3 Opportunities to punish free riding increase cooperation; 2.4 In experimental situations, most people behave as conditional cooperators rather than free riders; The influence of social networks on individual decision making; 2.5 The power of social monitoring: Pictures of eyes increased contributions to a beverage honor bar; The role of social norms in individual decision making; 2.6 Stickers placed in Kenyan minibuses reduced traffic accidents; Conclusion; Notes; References
Control code
898196469
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xvii, 215 pages)
File format
one file format
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781464803437
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations (some colour)
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)898196469

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      38.944491 -92.326012
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