Coverart for item
The Resource Odd women? : spinsters, lesbians and widows in British women's fiction, 1850s-1930s, Emma Liggins

Odd women? : spinsters, lesbians and widows in British women's fiction, 1850s-1930s, Emma Liggins

Label
Odd women? : spinsters, lesbians and widows in British women's fiction, 1850s-1930s
Title
Odd women?
Title remainder
spinsters, lesbians and widows in British women's fiction, 1850s-1930s
Statement of responsibility
Emma Liggins
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
This genealogy of the odd woman compares representations of spinsters, lesbians and widows in British women's fiction and auto/biography from the 1850s to the 1930s
Cataloging source
NLE
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Liggins, Emma
Dewey number
820.9928709034
Index
index present
LC call number
PR871.L544 2014
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Lesbians in literature
  • Single women in literature
  • Widows in literature
  • English literature
  • English literature
  • English literature
  • English literature
  • English literature
  • Lesbians in literature
  • Single women in literature
  • Widows in literature
Label
Odd women? : spinsters, lesbians and widows in British women's fiction, 1850s-1930s, Emma Liggins
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Previously issued in print: 2014
  • Introduction 1. Female redundancy, widowhood and the mid-Victorian heroine 2. Bachelor girls, mistresses and the New Woman heroine 3. Spinster heroines, aunts and widowed mothers, 1910-39 4. The misfit lesbian heroine of interwar fiction 5. Professional spinsters, older women and widowed heroines in the 1930s Conclusion Index
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Half-title; Title page; Copyright information; Table of contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1 Female redundancy, widowhood and the mid-Victorian heroine; Redundant women and invisible widows in the 1850s and 1860s; Victorian women's autobiographies and unorthodox private lives; Reinventing the old maid: Cranford and Hopes and Fears; Self-sufficiency and 'imaginary widowhood': The Clever Woman of the Family and Villette; 2 Bachelor girls, mistresses and the New Woman heroine; Bachelor girls and glorified spinsters; Work, celibacy and the spinster flat
  • Bohemianism and urban living in New Woman and suffragette autobiographiesAdoption, politics and streetwalking: Annie Holdsworth and Evelyn Sharp; 3 Spinster heroines, aunts and widowed mothers, 1910-39; The spinster question in the 1910s and 1920s; Inter-war women's autobiographies, the war and suffrage agitation; Daughters, aunts and out-dated Victorianism: F.M. Mayor and May Sinclair; The spinster and the uncertainties of modernity: E.H. Young and Lettice Cooper; 4 The misfit lesbian heroine of inter-war fiction; Inversion and intimate friendships
  • All-female environments and same-sex intimacy: Regiment of Women and Dusty AnswerLesbian life-writing: refusing abnormality; Witches and misfits: the fiction of Sylvia Townsend Warner and Radclyffe Hall; 5 Professional spinsters, older women and widowed heroines in the 1930s; The spinster and the widow in the 1920s and 1930s; Auto/biography and friendship: troubling the heteronormative; Cross-generational bonding and the older woman in the fiction of Winifred Holtby and Virginia Woolf; Vita Sackville-West, the widowed heroine and the post-marital; Conclusion; Select bibliography; Index
Control code
962073669
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781526111654
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
manchesteruniversitypress9028
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)962073669
Label
Odd women? : spinsters, lesbians and widows in British women's fiction, 1850s-1930s, Emma Liggins
Publication
Note
  • Previously issued in print: 2014
  • Introduction 1. Female redundancy, widowhood and the mid-Victorian heroine 2. Bachelor girls, mistresses and the New Woman heroine 3. Spinster heroines, aunts and widowed mothers, 1910-39 4. The misfit lesbian heroine of interwar fiction 5. Professional spinsters, older women and widowed heroines in the 1930s Conclusion Index
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Half-title; Title page; Copyright information; Table of contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1 Female redundancy, widowhood and the mid-Victorian heroine; Redundant women and invisible widows in the 1850s and 1860s; Victorian women's autobiographies and unorthodox private lives; Reinventing the old maid: Cranford and Hopes and Fears; Self-sufficiency and 'imaginary widowhood': The Clever Woman of the Family and Villette; 2 Bachelor girls, mistresses and the New Woman heroine; Bachelor girls and glorified spinsters; Work, celibacy and the spinster flat
  • Bohemianism and urban living in New Woman and suffragette autobiographiesAdoption, politics and streetwalking: Annie Holdsworth and Evelyn Sharp; 3 Spinster heroines, aunts and widowed mothers, 1910-39; The spinster question in the 1910s and 1920s; Inter-war women's autobiographies, the war and suffrage agitation; Daughters, aunts and out-dated Victorianism: F.M. Mayor and May Sinclair; The spinster and the uncertainties of modernity: E.H. Young and Lettice Cooper; 4 The misfit lesbian heroine of inter-war fiction; Inversion and intimate friendships
  • All-female environments and same-sex intimacy: Regiment of Women and Dusty AnswerLesbian life-writing: refusing abnormality; Witches and misfits: the fiction of Sylvia Townsend Warner and Radclyffe Hall; 5 Professional spinsters, older women and widowed heroines in the 1930s; The spinster and the widow in the 1920s and 1930s; Auto/biography and friendship: troubling the heteronormative; Cross-generational bonding and the older woman in the fiction of Winifred Holtby and Virginia Woolf; Vita Sackville-West, the widowed heroine and the post-marital; Conclusion; Select bibliography; Index
Control code
962073669
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781526111654
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
manchesteruniversitypress9028
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)962073669

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