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The Resource Painted faces on the Renaissance stage : the moral significance of face-painting conventions, Annette Drew-Bear

Painted faces on the Renaissance stage : the moral significance of face-painting conventions, Annette Drew-Bear

Label
Painted faces on the Renaissance stage : the moral significance of face-painting conventions
Title
Painted faces on the Renaissance stage
Title remainder
the moral significance of face-painting conventions
Statement of responsibility
Annette Drew-Bear
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • This is the first book to show how the painted face functioned as theatrical signal in Renaissance drama. Explaining the connection between red, white, and black makeup and sexual sin, devilish seduction, and poison, Annette Drew-Bear surveys how Renaissance dramatists used face-paint in tragedy to express a wide range of social, political, and sexual corruption
  • She also shows that in Renaissance comedy, playwrights exploited the many bawdy meanings of fucus, or cosmetic paint, to dramatize that "theres knauery in dawbing."
  • Drew-Bear argues that both on the stage and in society, the painted face was seen in moral terms. To understand the significance of face-painting in Shakespeare and other Renaissance dramatists, modern readers need to recover the convention of seeing a painted face as revealing an internal moral state
  • Demonstrating that stage face-painting conventions grew out of moral treatises, sermons, and social custom, Drew-Bear traces the origin of symbolic patterns of facial adornment and deformity in Medieval and Tudor drama. She shows how Ben Jonson developed his own satiric version of the cosmetic or fucus scene in six of his plays to dramatize the hypocrisy of both men and women. Shakespeare used red, white, and black painted faces in typically more complex and richly ironic ways than his contemporaries
  • The strength of this book is its abundance of fresh, new, authoritative evidence of face-painting that conclusively establishes how widespread and how richly significant the painted face was on the Renaissance stage. This work should be valuable to anyone interested in the evidence of linking players and face-paint and in the use of face-paint as theatrical signal in Medieval, Tudor, and Renaissance drama
  • Anyone curious about cosmetics and attitudes toward cosmetics will enjoy reading about the ingredients of the makeup worn by both women and men in the Renaissance to achieve the fashionable white face, rosy cheeks, and light hair. Equally intriguing are the effects of sometimes poisonous ingredients like lead, mercury, and vitriol
  • Supporting the text are six illustrations of face-painting that include a woodcut of the devil applying cosmetics, a painted Elizabethan lady, a made-up Elizabeth I, and Satan disguised as a fair-faced, buxom, blond lady. The first book-length study of its kind, Painted Faces on the Renaissance Stage should be of interest to all students of drama, theater history, and social custom in the age of Shakespeare and his contemporaries
  • She also shows that in Renaissance comedy, playwrights exploited the many bawdy meanings of fucus, or cosmetic paint, to dramatize that "theres knauery in dawbing."
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Drew-Bear, Annette
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • English drama
  • English drama
  • Face painting in literature
  • Theatrical makeup
  • Literature and morals
  • Literature and morals
  • Ethics in literature
  • Renaissance
  • Literature and morals
Label
Painted faces on the Renaissance stage : the moral significance of face-painting conventions, Annette Drew-Bear
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 107-133) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
27976831
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
139 pages
Isbn
9780838752302
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(WaOLN)1585115
Label
Painted faces on the Renaissance stage : the moral significance of face-painting conventions, Annette Drew-Bear
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 107-133) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
27976831
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
139 pages
Isbn
9780838752302
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(WaOLN)1585115

Library Locations

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      38.944491 -92.326012
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