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The Resource Principles of radical CV phonology : a theory of segmental and syllabic structure, Harry van der Hulst ; with the editorial assistance of Jeroen van de Weijer

Principles of radical CV phonology : a theory of segmental and syllabic structure, Harry van der Hulst ; with the editorial assistance of Jeroen van de Weijer

Label
Principles of radical CV phonology : a theory of segmental and syllabic structure
Title
Principles of radical CV phonology
Title remainder
a theory of segmental and syllabic structure
Statement of responsibility
Harry van der Hulst ; with the editorial assistance of Jeroen van de Weijer
Creator
Contributor
Author
Editor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
YDX
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hulst, Harry van der
Dewey number
414.018
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
P217
LC item number
.H85 2020
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1965-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Weijer, Jeroen Maarten van de
Series statement
Edinburgh studies in theoretical linguistics
Series volume
4
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Grammar, Comparative and general
  • Grammar, Comparative and general
Label
Principles of radical CV phonology : a theory of segmental and syllabic structure, Harry van der Hulst ; with the editorial assistance of Jeroen van de Weijer
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 431-478) and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
  • Manner
  • Edge (onset head): obstruents
  • 4.2.1.1.
  • Edge (onset head): head class
  • 4.2.1.2.
  • Edge (onset head): dependent class
  • 4.2.2.
  • Bridge (onset dependent): sonorants
  • 4.2.3.
  • Sonorant consonants as onset heads (including taps/flaps)
  • 4.2.4.
  • 5.
  • Laryngeal consonants
  • 4.3.
  • Rhyme
  • 4.3.1.
  • Nucleus (rhyme head): vowels
  • 4.3.1.1.
  • Nucleus (rhyme head): head class
  • 4.3.1.2.
  • Nucleus (rhyme head): dependent class
  • 4.3.2.
  • Place
  • Coda (rhyme dependent): sonorants
  • 4.3.3.
  • Coda conditions
  • 4.4.
  • Syllabic consonants (sonorants)
  • 4.5.
  • Long vowels, diphthongs and geminates
  • 4.6.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 5
  • 6.
  • Place
  • 5.1.
  • Introduction
  • 5.2.
  • Edge (onset head): obstruents
  • 5.2.1.
  • Edge (onset head): head class
  • 5.2.2.
  • Edge (onset head): dependent class
  • 5.2.3.
  • Laryngeal: phonation and tone
  • Post-velar consonants: pharyngeals and laryngeals
  • 5.2.4.
  • Place distinctions for sonorant consonants in the edge
  • 5.3.
  • Nucleus (rhyme head): vowels
  • 5.3.1.
  • Nucleus (rhyme head): head class
  • 5.3.2.
  • Nucleus (rhyme head): dependent class
  • 5.3.3.
  • 7.
  • Syllabic consonants (sonorants)
  • 5.4.
  • Bridge and coda
  • 5.5.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 6
  • Laryngeal: phonation and tone
  • 6.1.
  • Introduction
  • 6.2.
  • Special structures
  • Edge (onset head): consonants (phonation)
  • 6.3.
  • Nucleus (rhyme head): vowels (tone)
  • 6.4.
  • Four issues
  • 6.4.1.
  • Phonation oppositions in obstruents and sonorants
  • 6.4.2.
  • Laryngeal realism
  • 6.4.3.
  • 8.
  • Phonation in the nucleus
  • 6.4.4.
  • The correlation between tone and phonation
  • 6.5.
  • Bridge and coda
  • 6.6.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 7
  • Special structures
  • 7.1.
  • Predictability and preference
  • Introduction
  • 7.2.
  • Incomplete structures
  • 7.2.1.
  • No content at all
  • 7.2.1.1.
  • Vowel/zero alternations
  • 7.2.1.2.
  • Consonant clusters
  • 7.2.1.3.
  • 9.
  • Initial geminates
  • 7.2.1.4.
  • Schwa
  • 7.2.1.5.
  • Consonant/zero alternations
  • 7.2.1.6.
  • Ghost consonants
  • 7.2.1.7.
  • Morphological templates
  • 7.2.2.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Minimal specification
  • Partial content
  • 7.2.2.1.
  • No'no manner'
  • 7.2.2.2.
  • Manner only
  • 7.3.
  • Overcomplete structures
  • 7.3.1.
  • Complex consonants
  • 7.3.1.1.
  • 10.
  • Affricates
  • 7.3.1.2.
  • Consonants with secondary manner
  • 7.3.1.3.
  • Consonants with secondary place
  • 7.3.2.
  • Consonants with two major places (clicks and multiply-articulated consonants)
  • 7.3.3.
  • Complex vowels
  • 7.3.3.1.
  • Radical CV Phonology applied to sign phonology
  • Short diphthongs
  • 7.3.3.2.
  • Vowels with contour tones
  • 7.3.3.3.
  • Vowels with special phonation
  • 7.3.3.4.
  • Vowels with special manner
  • 7.3.4.
  • Branching syllabic constituents or t̀wo-root structures'
  • 7.4.
  • 11.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 8
  • Predictability and preference
  • 8.1.
  • Introduction
  • 8.2.
  • Harmony
  • 8.2.1.
  • Paradigmatic and cross-class harmony
  • 8.2.2.
  • Comparison to other models
  • Disharmony
  • 8.3.
  • Preference rankings of segments per syllabic position
  • 8.3.1.
  • Two determining principles: harmony and dispersion
  • 8.3.1.1.
  • Manner preferences
  • 8.3.1.1.1.
  • Manner preferences: edge
  • 8.3.1.1.2.
  • 12.
  • Manner preferences: nucleus
  • 8.3.1.1.3.
  • Manner preferences: bridge and coda
  • 8.3.1.2.
  • Place preferences
  • 8.3.1.2.1.
  • Place preferences: edge
  • 8.3.1.2.2.
  • Place preferences: nucleus
  • 8.3.1.3.
  • Conclusions
  • Laryngeal preferences
  • 8.3.1.3.1.
  • Laryngeal preferences: edge (phonation)
  • 8.3.1.3.2.
  • Laryngeal preferences: nucleus (tone)
  • 8.3.1.4.
  • Concluding remarks
  • 8.4.
  • Preferred segmental systems
  • 8.4.1.
  • ch. 1
  • The overall structure of segmental systems
  • 8.4.2.
  • Polysystematicity
  • 8.4.3.
  • Conclusions
  • 8.5.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 9
  • Minimal specification
  • 9.1.
  • Basic assumptions about phonology
  • Introduction
  • 9.2.
  • A typology of redundant properties
  • 9.3.
  • Radical underspecification
  • 9.4.
  • Contrastive and radical underspecification in a unary framework
  • 9.5.
  • Markedness, complexity and salience
  • 9.6.
  • 1.1.
  • Examples of minimal specification
  • 9.7.
  • Can redundant elements become active?
  • 9.8.
  • Constraints and learnability
  • 9.9.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 10
  • Radical CV Phonology applied to sign phonology
  • 10.1.
  • 1.
  • Introduction
  • Introduction
  • 10.2.
  • The macrostructure of signs
  • 10.3.
  • The microstructure of signs
  • 10.3.1.
  • The articulator
  • 10.3.1.1.
  • FingerSelection
  • 10.3.1.2.
  • 1.2.
  • FingerConfiguration
  • 10.3.2.
  • Orientation
  • 10.3.3.
  • Place
  • 10.3.4.
  • Manner (m̀ovement')
  • 10.4.
  • Two-handed signs
  • 10.5.
  • What is phonology?
  • What about syllable structure?
  • 10.6.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 11
  • Comparison to other models
  • 11.1.
  • Introduction
  • 11.2.
  • Feature Geometry models
  • 11.3.
  • 1.3.
  • Other models
  • 11.3.1.
  • Dependency models
  • 11.3.2.
  • The nested subregister model
  • 11.3.3.
  • The Toronto model
  • 11.3.4.
  • The parallel structure model
  • 11.3.5.
  • Six theses concerning phonological primes
  • The channel-neutral model
  • 11.3.6.
  • The Duanmu model
  • 11.3.7.
  • Government Phonology 2.0
  • 11.3.8.
  • Q-theory
  • 11.4.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 12
  • 1.3.1.
  • Conclusions
  • 12.1.
  • Introduction
  • 12.2.
  • Goals and basic principles
  • 12.3.
  • X-bar structure everywhere
  • 12.4.
  • Strengths and weaknesses
  • 12.5.
  • Are features based on perception or articulation?
  • Some unresolved issues
  • 12.6.
  • What's next?
  • 1.3.2.
  • Are features innate?
  • 1.3.3.
  • Basic assumptions about phonology
  • Are features, or is phonology in general, substance-free?
  • 1.3.4.
  • Are phonological representations fully specified?
  • 1.3.5.
  • Is there such a thing as a segment inventory?
  • 1.3.6.
  • Are there still phonemes?
  • 1.4.
  • Is phonology different?
  • 1.5.
  • 2.
  • Alternations and processes
  • 1.6.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 2
  • Background: Dependency and Government Phonology
  • 2.1.
  • Introduction
  • 2.2.
  • Monovalency, grouping, dependency and contrastivity
  • 2.2.1.
  • Background: Dependency and Government Phonology
  • Monovalency
  • 2.2.2.
  • The triangular set
  • 2.2.3.
  • Grouping and elements in Dependency Phonology
  • 2.2.4.
  • Developments in Dependency Phonology
  • 2.2.5.
  • Minimal specification and polysysternaticity
  • 2.3.
  • 3.
  • Government Phonology
  • 2.4.
  • Towards Radical CV Phonology
  • 2.5.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 3
  • Radical CV Phonology
  • 3.1.
  • Introduction
  • 3.2.
  • Radical CV Phonology
  • An outline of Radical CV Phonology
  • 3.2.1.
  • The segmental model
  • 3.2.2.
  • Syllable structure
  • 3.2.3.
  • Empirical issues
  • 3.2.4.
  • The segment-syllable connection
  • 3.2.5.
  • 4.
  • Recursivity in syllables or foot structure in Radical CV Phonology
  • 3.3.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 4
  • Manner
  • 4.1.
  • Introduction
  • 4.2.
  • Onset
  • 4.2.1.
Control code
1085214061
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xiv, 497 pages
Isbn
9781474454667
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations (black and white)
System control number
(OCoLC)1085214061
Label
Principles of radical CV phonology : a theory of segmental and syllabic structure, Harry van der Hulst ; with the editorial assistance of Jeroen van de Weijer
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 431-478) and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
  • Manner
  • Edge (onset head): obstruents
  • 4.2.1.1.
  • Edge (onset head): head class
  • 4.2.1.2.
  • Edge (onset head): dependent class
  • 4.2.2.
  • Bridge (onset dependent): sonorants
  • 4.2.3.
  • Sonorant consonants as onset heads (including taps/flaps)
  • 4.2.4.
  • 5.
  • Laryngeal consonants
  • 4.3.
  • Rhyme
  • 4.3.1.
  • Nucleus (rhyme head): vowels
  • 4.3.1.1.
  • Nucleus (rhyme head): head class
  • 4.3.1.2.
  • Nucleus (rhyme head): dependent class
  • 4.3.2.
  • Place
  • Coda (rhyme dependent): sonorants
  • 4.3.3.
  • Coda conditions
  • 4.4.
  • Syllabic consonants (sonorants)
  • 4.5.
  • Long vowels, diphthongs and geminates
  • 4.6.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 5
  • 6.
  • Place
  • 5.1.
  • Introduction
  • 5.2.
  • Edge (onset head): obstruents
  • 5.2.1.
  • Edge (onset head): head class
  • 5.2.2.
  • Edge (onset head): dependent class
  • 5.2.3.
  • Laryngeal: phonation and tone
  • Post-velar consonants: pharyngeals and laryngeals
  • 5.2.4.
  • Place distinctions for sonorant consonants in the edge
  • 5.3.
  • Nucleus (rhyme head): vowels
  • 5.3.1.
  • Nucleus (rhyme head): head class
  • 5.3.2.
  • Nucleus (rhyme head): dependent class
  • 5.3.3.
  • 7.
  • Syllabic consonants (sonorants)
  • 5.4.
  • Bridge and coda
  • 5.5.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 6
  • Laryngeal: phonation and tone
  • 6.1.
  • Introduction
  • 6.2.
  • Special structures
  • Edge (onset head): consonants (phonation)
  • 6.3.
  • Nucleus (rhyme head): vowels (tone)
  • 6.4.
  • Four issues
  • 6.4.1.
  • Phonation oppositions in obstruents and sonorants
  • 6.4.2.
  • Laryngeal realism
  • 6.4.3.
  • 8.
  • Phonation in the nucleus
  • 6.4.4.
  • The correlation between tone and phonation
  • 6.5.
  • Bridge and coda
  • 6.6.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 7
  • Special structures
  • 7.1.
  • Predictability and preference
  • Introduction
  • 7.2.
  • Incomplete structures
  • 7.2.1.
  • No content at all
  • 7.2.1.1.
  • Vowel/zero alternations
  • 7.2.1.2.
  • Consonant clusters
  • 7.2.1.3.
  • 9.
  • Initial geminates
  • 7.2.1.4.
  • Schwa
  • 7.2.1.5.
  • Consonant/zero alternations
  • 7.2.1.6.
  • Ghost consonants
  • 7.2.1.7.
  • Morphological templates
  • 7.2.2.
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Minimal specification
  • Partial content
  • 7.2.2.1.
  • No'no manner'
  • 7.2.2.2.
  • Manner only
  • 7.3.
  • Overcomplete structures
  • 7.3.1.
  • Complex consonants
  • 7.3.1.1.
  • 10.
  • Affricates
  • 7.3.1.2.
  • Consonants with secondary manner
  • 7.3.1.3.
  • Consonants with secondary place
  • 7.3.2.
  • Consonants with two major places (clicks and multiply-articulated consonants)
  • 7.3.3.
  • Complex vowels
  • 7.3.3.1.
  • Radical CV Phonology applied to sign phonology
  • Short diphthongs
  • 7.3.3.2.
  • Vowels with contour tones
  • 7.3.3.3.
  • Vowels with special phonation
  • 7.3.3.4.
  • Vowels with special manner
  • 7.3.4.
  • Branching syllabic constituents or t̀wo-root structures'
  • 7.4.
  • 11.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 8
  • Predictability and preference
  • 8.1.
  • Introduction
  • 8.2.
  • Harmony
  • 8.2.1.
  • Paradigmatic and cross-class harmony
  • 8.2.2.
  • Comparison to other models
  • Disharmony
  • 8.3.
  • Preference rankings of segments per syllabic position
  • 8.3.1.
  • Two determining principles: harmony and dispersion
  • 8.3.1.1.
  • Manner preferences
  • 8.3.1.1.1.
  • Manner preferences: edge
  • 8.3.1.1.2.
  • 12.
  • Manner preferences: nucleus
  • 8.3.1.1.3.
  • Manner preferences: bridge and coda
  • 8.3.1.2.
  • Place preferences
  • 8.3.1.2.1.
  • Place preferences: edge
  • 8.3.1.2.2.
  • Place preferences: nucleus
  • 8.3.1.3.
  • Conclusions
  • Laryngeal preferences
  • 8.3.1.3.1.
  • Laryngeal preferences: edge (phonation)
  • 8.3.1.3.2.
  • Laryngeal preferences: nucleus (tone)
  • 8.3.1.4.
  • Concluding remarks
  • 8.4.
  • Preferred segmental systems
  • 8.4.1.
  • ch. 1
  • The overall structure of segmental systems
  • 8.4.2.
  • Polysystematicity
  • 8.4.3.
  • Conclusions
  • 8.5.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 9
  • Minimal specification
  • 9.1.
  • Basic assumptions about phonology
  • Introduction
  • 9.2.
  • A typology of redundant properties
  • 9.3.
  • Radical underspecification
  • 9.4.
  • Contrastive and radical underspecification in a unary framework
  • 9.5.
  • Markedness, complexity and salience
  • 9.6.
  • 1.1.
  • Examples of minimal specification
  • 9.7.
  • Can redundant elements become active?
  • 9.8.
  • Constraints and learnability
  • 9.9.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 10
  • Radical CV Phonology applied to sign phonology
  • 10.1.
  • 1.
  • Introduction
  • Introduction
  • 10.2.
  • The macrostructure of signs
  • 10.3.
  • The microstructure of signs
  • 10.3.1.
  • The articulator
  • 10.3.1.1.
  • FingerSelection
  • 10.3.1.2.
  • 1.2.
  • FingerConfiguration
  • 10.3.2.
  • Orientation
  • 10.3.3.
  • Place
  • 10.3.4.
  • Manner (m̀ovement')
  • 10.4.
  • Two-handed signs
  • 10.5.
  • What is phonology?
  • What about syllable structure?
  • 10.6.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 11
  • Comparison to other models
  • 11.1.
  • Introduction
  • 11.2.
  • Feature Geometry models
  • 11.3.
  • 1.3.
  • Other models
  • 11.3.1.
  • Dependency models
  • 11.3.2.
  • The nested subregister model
  • 11.3.3.
  • The Toronto model
  • 11.3.4.
  • The parallel structure model
  • 11.3.5.
  • Six theses concerning phonological primes
  • The channel-neutral model
  • 11.3.6.
  • The Duanmu model
  • 11.3.7.
  • Government Phonology 2.0
  • 11.3.8.
  • Q-theory
  • 11.4.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 12
  • 1.3.1.
  • Conclusions
  • 12.1.
  • Introduction
  • 12.2.
  • Goals and basic principles
  • 12.3.
  • X-bar structure everywhere
  • 12.4.
  • Strengths and weaknesses
  • 12.5.
  • Are features based on perception or articulation?
  • Some unresolved issues
  • 12.6.
  • What's next?
  • 1.3.2.
  • Are features innate?
  • 1.3.3.
  • Basic assumptions about phonology
  • Are features, or is phonology in general, substance-free?
  • 1.3.4.
  • Are phonological representations fully specified?
  • 1.3.5.
  • Is there such a thing as a segment inventory?
  • 1.3.6.
  • Are there still phonemes?
  • 1.4.
  • Is phonology different?
  • 1.5.
  • 2.
  • Alternations and processes
  • 1.6.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 2
  • Background: Dependency and Government Phonology
  • 2.1.
  • Introduction
  • 2.2.
  • Monovalency, grouping, dependency and contrastivity
  • 2.2.1.
  • Background: Dependency and Government Phonology
  • Monovalency
  • 2.2.2.
  • The triangular set
  • 2.2.3.
  • Grouping and elements in Dependency Phonology
  • 2.2.4.
  • Developments in Dependency Phonology
  • 2.2.5.
  • Minimal specification and polysysternaticity
  • 2.3.
  • 3.
  • Government Phonology
  • 2.4.
  • Towards Radical CV Phonology
  • 2.5.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 3
  • Radical CV Phonology
  • 3.1.
  • Introduction
  • 3.2.
  • Radical CV Phonology
  • An outline of Radical CV Phonology
  • 3.2.1.
  • The segmental model
  • 3.2.2.
  • Syllable structure
  • 3.2.3.
  • Empirical issues
  • 3.2.4.
  • The segment-syllable connection
  • 3.2.5.
  • 4.
  • Recursivity in syllables or foot structure in Radical CV Phonology
  • 3.3.
  • Summary and concluding remarks
  • ch. 4
  • Manner
  • 4.1.
  • Introduction
  • 4.2.
  • Onset
  • 4.2.1.
Control code
1085214061
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xiv, 497 pages
Isbn
9781474454667
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations (black and white)
System control number
(OCoLC)1085214061

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