Coverart for item
The Resource Processing politics : learning from television in the Internet age, Doris A. Graber

Processing politics : learning from television in the Internet age, Doris A. Graber

Label
Processing politics : learning from television in the Internet age
Title
Processing politics
Title remainder
learning from television in the Internet age
Statement of responsibility
Doris A. Graber
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Annotation
Member of
Cataloging source
E7B
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1923-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Graber, Doris A.
Dewey number
070.1/95
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
PN4888.T4
LC item number
.G73 2001eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Studies in Communication, Media, and Public Opinion
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Television broadcasting of news
  • Communication in politics
  • Human information processing
  • Communication in politics
  • Human information processing
  • Television broadcasting of news
  • United States
Summary expansion
How often do we hear that Americans are so ignorant about politics that their civic competence is impaired, and that the media are to blame because they do a dismal job of informing the public? Processing Politics shows that average Americans are far smarter than the critics believe. Integrating a broad range of current research on how people learn (from political science, social psychology, communication, physiology, and artificial intelligence), Doris Graber shows that televised presentationsat their bestactually excel at transmitting information and facilitating learning. She critiques current political offerings in terms of their compatibility with our learning capacities and interests, and she considers the obstacles, both economic and political, that affect the content we receive on the air, on cable, or on the Internet. More and more people rely on information from television and the Internet to make important decisions. Processing Politics offers a sound, well-researched defense of these remarkably versatile media, and challenges us to make them work for us in our democracy
Label
Processing politics : learning from television in the Internet age, Doris A. Graber
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • List of Illustrations -- Tables -- 1.1 Primary News Sources for Various Demographic Groups -- 1.2 Adequacy of Media Coverage -- 2.1 Large (15-point) Differences in Knowledge of Politics -- 2.2 Orchestration of a Campaign Advertisement -- 3.1 Complexity of Issue Discussions: Ratio of Simple to Complex Statements -- 3.2 Complexity Levels by Focus Groups -- 3.3 Complexity Levels by Issue Areas -- 4.1 Sample Visual Cues for Common Themes -- 4.2 Visual Information in Foreign Affairs News -- 4.3 Picture Contributions to Verbal Themes in Routine Nonfeature News Stories
  • 4.4 Real and Imagined Picture Contribution -- 5.1 Satisfaction with Television Programming, 1998 (1994) -- 5.2 Politically Informative Segments on Typical Nightly National Newscasts, 1997-98 -- 5.3 Hours of Politically Relevant Programming on Weekdays and Weekends -- 6.1 High Public Attentiveness to Major News Stories, 1986-2000 -- 6.2 Low Public Attentiveness to Major News Stories, 1986-2000 -- 6.3 Selective versus Routine News Attention, 1998 -- 6.4 Close Attention to Various News Topics, 2000 -- 6.5 Profile of 10:00 P.M. Network Newscasts in Chicago, 1997
  • 6.6 Nonadvertising Time Distribution in Chicago, 1997 -- 6.7 Journalists' Frames versus Audiences' Frames for Five Stories -- 6.8 News Element Coverage in Broadcast Stories -- 6.9 News Content Attractions in Television, Newspapers, and Magazines -- 6.10 Typical News Sequencing and Breaks -- 7.1 Interest in Technological Innovations by Generation -- 7.2 News Interests by Generation -- 7.3 Changing News Story Emphasis -- 7.4 Emphasis of Prime-Time News Magazine Stories -- A.1 Code Summation Sheet -- Boxes -- Economic Problems as Seen by Black Voters -- Language Complexity in Broadcast News
  • An Example of Gestalt Coding -- Preface -- 1. Political Television: Puzzles and Problems -- 2. Political Learning: How Our Brains Process Complex Information -- 3. To Know or Not to Know: Questions about Civic Wisdom -- 4. Freeing Audiovisual Technologies from the Gutenberg Legacy -- 5. The Battles over Audiovisual Content -- 6. Making News Selection, Framing, and Formatting More User-Friendly -- 7. Peering into the Crystal Ball: What Does the Future Hold? -- Appendix: Methods -- References -- Index
Control code
900886058
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (247 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780226924762
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other control number
9780226305752
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)900886058
Label
Processing politics : learning from television in the Internet age, Doris A. Graber
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • List of Illustrations -- Tables -- 1.1 Primary News Sources for Various Demographic Groups -- 1.2 Adequacy of Media Coverage -- 2.1 Large (15-point) Differences in Knowledge of Politics -- 2.2 Orchestration of a Campaign Advertisement -- 3.1 Complexity of Issue Discussions: Ratio of Simple to Complex Statements -- 3.2 Complexity Levels by Focus Groups -- 3.3 Complexity Levels by Issue Areas -- 4.1 Sample Visual Cues for Common Themes -- 4.2 Visual Information in Foreign Affairs News -- 4.3 Picture Contributions to Verbal Themes in Routine Nonfeature News Stories
  • 4.4 Real and Imagined Picture Contribution -- 5.1 Satisfaction with Television Programming, 1998 (1994) -- 5.2 Politically Informative Segments on Typical Nightly National Newscasts, 1997-98 -- 5.3 Hours of Politically Relevant Programming on Weekdays and Weekends -- 6.1 High Public Attentiveness to Major News Stories, 1986-2000 -- 6.2 Low Public Attentiveness to Major News Stories, 1986-2000 -- 6.3 Selective versus Routine News Attention, 1998 -- 6.4 Close Attention to Various News Topics, 2000 -- 6.5 Profile of 10:00 P.M. Network Newscasts in Chicago, 1997
  • 6.6 Nonadvertising Time Distribution in Chicago, 1997 -- 6.7 Journalists' Frames versus Audiences' Frames for Five Stories -- 6.8 News Element Coverage in Broadcast Stories -- 6.9 News Content Attractions in Television, Newspapers, and Magazines -- 6.10 Typical News Sequencing and Breaks -- 7.1 Interest in Technological Innovations by Generation -- 7.2 News Interests by Generation -- 7.3 Changing News Story Emphasis -- 7.4 Emphasis of Prime-Time News Magazine Stories -- A.1 Code Summation Sheet -- Boxes -- Economic Problems as Seen by Black Voters -- Language Complexity in Broadcast News
  • An Example of Gestalt Coding -- Preface -- 1. Political Television: Puzzles and Problems -- 2. Political Learning: How Our Brains Process Complex Information -- 3. To Know or Not to Know: Questions about Civic Wisdom -- 4. Freeing Audiovisual Technologies from the Gutenberg Legacy -- 5. The Battles over Audiovisual Content -- 6. Making News Selection, Framing, and Formatting More User-Friendly -- 7. Peering into the Crystal Ball: What Does the Future Hold? -- Appendix: Methods -- References -- Index
Control code
900886058
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (247 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780226924762
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other control number
9780226305752
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)900886058

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