Coverart for item
The Resource Putting Monet and Rembrandt into words : Pierre Loti's recreation and theorization of Claude Monet's impressionism and Rembrandt's landscapes in literature, by Richard M. Berrong

Putting Monet and Rembrandt into words : Pierre Loti's recreation and theorization of Claude Monet's impressionism and Rembrandt's landscapes in literature, by Richard M. Berrong

Label
Putting Monet and Rembrandt into words : Pierre Loti's recreation and theorization of Claude Monet's impressionism and Rembrandt's landscapes in literature
Title
Putting Monet and Rembrandt into words
Title remainder
Pierre Loti's recreation and theorization of Claude Monet's impressionism and Rembrandt's landscapes in literature
Statement of responsibility
by Richard M. Berrong
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • "Examining certain of Loti's important novels, this study shows how he managed to reproduce with words what Monet was doing in oils. It also shows how the author came to theorize about the effects of Impressionism on the reader-viewer. Finally, it demonstrates how and why, in one of his last novels, Loti undertook to reproduce the style of one of the painters most admired by Monet: Rembrandt van Rijn, whom the nineteenth-century French rediscovered in part because they could present his sketchy biography as a demonstration of many of the things liberal art historians and painters believed the ideal artist should be."--from publisher's Web site
  • Claude Monet was not only the creator of what we now view as French Impressionist painting, he was also its last major practitioner. By the time he passed away in 1926, he had outlived all the other painters--Renoir, Morisot, Pissarro, Sisley, and the others whom we now group together under that heading. Yet when Andre Suares, one of the four directors--along with Gide, Valery, and Claudel--of the influential Nouvelle Revue Francaise, summed up the movement that year, he did not give Monet pride of place. Rather, he wrote, "Far more than Sisley, Claude Monet, or the Goncourt brothers, Loti was the great Impressionist." As this shows, that Pierre Loti, the once world-renowned French novelist, developed a remarkably Impressionist style was recognized early on. It continues to be acknowledged in France today. Franck Ferrand, a contemporary historian known for his appearances on French radio and television, recently wrote that "Pierre Loti [is] the only truly impressionist writer of French literature." Yet while those who know his work in France continue to see him as an Impressionist artist on the level of Monet and Renoir, no one has ever asked how he achieved this in literature, how he went about creating novels that resembled the work of Monet. That is the subject of this book. Examining certain of Loti's important novels, this study shows how he managed to reproduce with words what Monet was doing in oils. It also shows how the author came to theorize about the effects of Impressionism on the reader-viewer. Finally, it demonstrates how and why, in one of his last novels, Loti undertook to reproduce the style of one of the painters most admired by Monet: Rembrandt van Rijn, whom the nineteenth-century French rediscovered in part because they could present his sketchy biography as a demonstration of many of the things liberal art historians and painters believed the ideal artist should be. --Provided by publisher
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1951-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Berrong, Richard M.
Dewey number
843/.8
Index
index present
LC call number
PQ2472.Z8
LC item number
B47 2013
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
North Carolina studies in the Romance languages and literatures
Series volume
number 301
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Impressionism in literature
  • Landscapes in art
  • Art in literature
  • Landscapes in literature
  • Art in literature
  • Loti, Pierre
  • Monet, Claude
  • Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn
Label
Putting Monet and Rembrandt into words : Pierre Loti's recreation and theorization of Claude Monet's impressionism and Rembrandt's landscapes in literature, by Richard M. Berrong
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
  • OK, "Loti was the great impressionist," but what does that mean?
  • Recreating Monet's impressionism in literature: Icelandic Fisherman
  • Loti's response to Zola on impressionism: Madame Chrysanthemum
  • Painting effectively in literature: The Story of a Child and The Travel Narratives
  • The anti-establishment, natural artist: Rembrandt and Ramuntcho
Control code
853435882
Dimensions
23 cm.
Extent
197 pages
Isbn
9781469613659
Isbn Type
(paperback)
Lccn
2013024984
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
System control number
(OCoLC)853435882
Label
Putting Monet and Rembrandt into words : Pierre Loti's recreation and theorization of Claude Monet's impressionism and Rembrandt's landscapes in literature, by Richard M. Berrong
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
  • OK, "Loti was the great impressionist," but what does that mean?
  • Recreating Monet's impressionism in literature: Icelandic Fisherman
  • Loti's response to Zola on impressionism: Madame Chrysanthemum
  • Painting effectively in literature: The Story of a Child and The Travel Narratives
  • The anti-establishment, natural artist: Rembrandt and Ramuntcho
Control code
853435882
Dimensions
23 cm.
Extent
197 pages
Isbn
9781469613659
Isbn Type
(paperback)
Lccn
2013024984
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
System control number
(OCoLC)853435882

Library Locations

    • Ellis LibraryBorrow it
      1020 Lowry Street, Columbia, MO, 65201, US
      38.944491 -92.326012
Processing Feedback ...