Coverart for item
The Resource Re-Inventing the Book : Challenges from the Past for the Publishing Industry, Christina Banou

Re-Inventing the Book : Challenges from the Past for the Publishing Industry, Christina Banou

Label
Re-Inventing the Book : Challenges from the Past for the Publishing Industry
Title
Re-Inventing the Book
Title remainder
Challenges from the Past for the Publishing Industry
Statement of responsibility
Christina Banou
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
NLE
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Banou, Christina
Dewey number
028/.8
Index
no index present
LC call number
Z1003
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Books and reading
  • Books
  • Book industries and trade
  • LITERARY CRITICISM / Books & Reading
  • Book industries and trade
  • Books
  • Books and reading
Label
Re-Inventing the Book : Challenges from the Past for the Publishing Industry, Christina Banou
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Introduction: the continuing revolution of Gutenberg 1 1.1 The continuing revolution of Gutenberg: the publishing industry at a turning point 1 1.2 New worlds for old strategies, new words for old values 5 1.3 Toward a methodological and theoretical framework for publishing 10 1.4 The structure of the book 13 References 16 2 Reimagining the book: aesthetics in publishing 19 2.1 Setting the scene: from illustration to new multimedia technologies. Approaches and trends 19 2.2 The artistic identity of the book
  • Publishers, readers and the democratization of taste 24 2.3 The aesthetics publishing chain-circle and its explanations 33 2.4 Reconstructing the book: the value of the paratext 42 2.5 Reader participation and personalized copies: new aesthetic and business models 57 2.6 Reconsidering the boundaries of the book: convergence 62 2.7 Recalling Renaissance woodcuts: from painted prints of Renaissance to colouring books of the digital era 65 2.8 Why aesthetics in publishing is still important. The aesthetic capital 67 References 70 3 Reengaging readers, rediscovering strategies 75 3.1 Reader engagement and the emergence of publishing strategies 75 3.2 Lessons from the past: reader participation in the publishing chain
  • Case studies from Renaissance and the Baroque 78 3.3 Readersourcing 85 3.4 Rediscovering preorders 90 3.5 From patronage to crowdfunding 94 viii Contents 3.6 Short forms, serialization,
  • re-considering values 133 5.2 Keep reinventing: challenges from the past for the publishing industry 139 5.3 A comment as epilogue. Time and the book (or reinventing ourselves) 145 References 146 Timeline 147 Index 149
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover; Re-Inventing the Book; Series Page; Re-Inventing the Book: Challenges from the Past forthe Publishing IndustryAMSTERDAM; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Foreword; Preface and Acknowledgements; 1 -- Introduction: the continuing revolution of Gutenberg; 1.1 The continuing revolution of Gutenberg: the publishing industry at a turning point; 1.2 New worlds for old strategies, new words for old values; 1.3 Toward a methodological and theoretical framework for publishing; 1.4 The structure of the book; References; 2 -- Reimagining the book: aesthetics in publishing
  • 2.1 Setting the scene: from illustration to new multimedia technologies. Approaches and trends2.2 The artistic identity of the book. Publishers, readers and the democratization of taste; 2.2.1 Towards the democratization of taste; 2.2.2 The role and concepts of book illustration and ornamentation; 2.2.3 Developing the artistic identity of the book; 2.3 The aesthetics publishing chain-circle and its explanations; 2.3.1 The aesthetics publishing chain-circle-circuit since Renaissance; 2.3.2 The book as a visual-valuable-viable object and its historical explanations
  • 2.3.3 Visual information and consumption cultures from Vasari to the digital era2.3.4 Information and experience: the old printed book in terms of 'social media'. The case of Peregrinatio in Terram Sanctam; 2.4 Reconstructing the book: the value of the paratext; 2.4.1 What is paratext?; 2.4.2 Visual and verbal paratext; 2.4.3 Front matter; 2.4.4 Title page and cover; 2.4.5 Creating celebrities: frontispiece and the author's portrait; 2.4.6 The printed page; 2.4.7 The printer's mark; 2.4.8 Running titles -- page headlines; 2.4.9 Dedicatory letters -- epistles
  • 2.4.10 Paratext, patronage and book promotion: added value for all2.4.11 Visual paratext, digital paratext and a comment; 2.5 Reader participation and personalized copies: new aesthetic and business models; 2.5.1 Personalized copies then and now; 2.5.2 From dedicatory letters of Renaissance to dedicatory copies and editions of the digital Age; 2.5.3 Reader engagement in the artistic identity of the book; 2.6 Reconsidering the boundaries of the book: convergence; 2.6.1 Convergence cultures; 2.6.2 Gamification and other opportunities &
  • 2.7 Recalling Renaissance woodcuts: from painted prints of Renaissance to colouring books of the digital era2.8 Why aesthetics in publishing is still important. The aesthetic capital; References; 3 -- Reengaging readers, rediscovering strategies; 3.1 Reader engagement and the emergence of publishing strategies; 3.2 Lessons from the past: reader participation in the publishing chain. Case studies from Renaissance and the Baroque; 3.2.1 The case of Pietro Aretino in Renaissance Rome and Venice; 3.2.2 The case of Torquato Accetto in Baroque Naples; 3.2.3 The reader as corrector
Control code
964918008
Extent
1 online resource (163 pages).
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Owing to Legal Deposit regulations this resource may only be accessed from within National Library of Scotland. For more information contact enquiries@nls.uk.
Isbn
9780081012796
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
9780081012796
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)964918008
Label
Re-Inventing the Book : Challenges from the Past for the Publishing Industry, Christina Banou
Publication
Note
  • Introduction: the continuing revolution of Gutenberg 1 1.1 The continuing revolution of Gutenberg: the publishing industry at a turning point 1 1.2 New worlds for old strategies, new words for old values 5 1.3 Toward a methodological and theoretical framework for publishing 10 1.4 The structure of the book 13 References 16 2 Reimagining the book: aesthetics in publishing 19 2.1 Setting the scene: from illustration to new multimedia technologies. Approaches and trends 19 2.2 The artistic identity of the book
  • Publishers, readers and the democratization of taste 24 2.3 The aesthetics publishing chain-circle and its explanations 33 2.4 Reconstructing the book: the value of the paratext 42 2.5 Reader participation and personalized copies: new aesthetic and business models 57 2.6 Reconsidering the boundaries of the book: convergence 62 2.7 Recalling Renaissance woodcuts: from painted prints of Renaissance to colouring books of the digital era 65 2.8 Why aesthetics in publishing is still important. The aesthetic capital 67 References 70 3 Reengaging readers, rediscovering strategies 75 3.1 Reader engagement and the emergence of publishing strategies 75 3.2 Lessons from the past: reader participation in the publishing chain
  • Case studies from Renaissance and the Baroque 78 3.3 Readersourcing 85 3.4 Rediscovering preorders 90 3.5 From patronage to crowdfunding 94 viii Contents 3.6 Short forms, serialization,
  • re-considering values 133 5.2 Keep reinventing: challenges from the past for the publishing industry 139 5.3 A comment as epilogue. Time and the book (or reinventing ourselves) 145 References 146 Timeline 147 Index 149
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover; Re-Inventing the Book; Series Page; Re-Inventing the Book: Challenges from the Past forthe Publishing IndustryAMSTERDAM; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Foreword; Preface and Acknowledgements; 1 -- Introduction: the continuing revolution of Gutenberg; 1.1 The continuing revolution of Gutenberg: the publishing industry at a turning point; 1.2 New worlds for old strategies, new words for old values; 1.3 Toward a methodological and theoretical framework for publishing; 1.4 The structure of the book; References; 2 -- Reimagining the book: aesthetics in publishing
  • 2.1 Setting the scene: from illustration to new multimedia technologies. Approaches and trends2.2 The artistic identity of the book. Publishers, readers and the democratization of taste; 2.2.1 Towards the democratization of taste; 2.2.2 The role and concepts of book illustration and ornamentation; 2.2.3 Developing the artistic identity of the book; 2.3 The aesthetics publishing chain-circle and its explanations; 2.3.1 The aesthetics publishing chain-circle-circuit since Renaissance; 2.3.2 The book as a visual-valuable-viable object and its historical explanations
  • 2.3.3 Visual information and consumption cultures from Vasari to the digital era2.3.4 Information and experience: the old printed book in terms of 'social media'. The case of Peregrinatio in Terram Sanctam; 2.4 Reconstructing the book: the value of the paratext; 2.4.1 What is paratext?; 2.4.2 Visual and verbal paratext; 2.4.3 Front matter; 2.4.4 Title page and cover; 2.4.5 Creating celebrities: frontispiece and the author's portrait; 2.4.6 The printed page; 2.4.7 The printer's mark; 2.4.8 Running titles -- page headlines; 2.4.9 Dedicatory letters -- epistles
  • 2.4.10 Paratext, patronage and book promotion: added value for all2.4.11 Visual paratext, digital paratext and a comment; 2.5 Reader participation and personalized copies: new aesthetic and business models; 2.5.1 Personalized copies then and now; 2.5.2 From dedicatory letters of Renaissance to dedicatory copies and editions of the digital Age; 2.5.3 Reader engagement in the artistic identity of the book; 2.6 Reconsidering the boundaries of the book: convergence; 2.6.1 Convergence cultures; 2.6.2 Gamification and other opportunities &
  • 2.7 Recalling Renaissance woodcuts: from painted prints of Renaissance to colouring books of the digital era2.8 Why aesthetics in publishing is still important. The aesthetic capital; References; 3 -- Reengaging readers, rediscovering strategies; 3.1 Reader engagement and the emergence of publishing strategies; 3.2 Lessons from the past: reader participation in the publishing chain. Case studies from Renaissance and the Baroque; 3.2.1 The case of Pietro Aretino in Renaissance Rome and Venice; 3.2.2 The case of Torquato Accetto in Baroque Naples; 3.2.3 The reader as corrector
Control code
964918008
Extent
1 online resource (163 pages).
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Owing to Legal Deposit regulations this resource may only be accessed from within National Library of Scotland. For more information contact enquiries@nls.uk.
Isbn
9780081012796
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
9780081012796
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)964918008

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