Coverart for item
The Resource Textbook of rapid response systems : concept and implementation, Michael A. DeVita, Ken Hillman, editors

Textbook of rapid response systems : concept and implementation, Michael A. DeVita, Ken Hillman, editors

Label
Textbook of rapid response systems : concept and implementation
Title
Textbook of rapid response systems
Title remainder
concept and implementation
Statement of responsibility
Michael A. DeVita, Ken Hillman, editors
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
The latest edition of this text is the go-to book on rapid response systems (RRS). Thoroughly updated to incorporate current principles and practice of RRS, the text covers topics such as the logistics of creating an RRS, patient safety, quality of care, evaluating program results, and engaging in systems research. Edited and written by internationally recognized experts and innovators in the field, Textbook of Rapid Response Systems: Concepts and Implementation, Second Edition is a valuable resource for medical practitioners and hospital administrators who want to implement and improve a rapid response system
Cataloging source
N$T
Dewey number
362.18
Index
index present
LC call number
RA975.5.E5
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
NLM call number
WX 162.5
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • DeVita, Michael A.
  • Hillman, Ken
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Hospitals
  • Health care teams
  • Medical emergencies
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Hospital Rapid Response Team
  • Emergency Service, Hospital
  • Patient Care Management
  • Patient Safety
  • Organizational Innovation
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Health care teams
  • Hospitals
  • Medical emergencies
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE
Label
Textbook of rapid response systems : concept and implementation, Michael A. DeVita, Ken Hillman, editors
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Dedication; Preface; Contents; Contributors; Part I: RRSs and Patient Safety; 1: Why Have a Rapid Response System? Cold with Fear: The Patient and Family Experience of Failure to Rescue; Lewis's Story; Noah's Story; D.J.'s Story; Curtis's Story; The Voice of the Patient; Patient-Activated Rapid Response; Beyond Patient Activation; The Learning Institution; Alyssa's Story; References; 2: Rapid Response Systems: History and Terminology; Principles; Terminology; Summary; References; 3: RRS's General Principles; Introduction; Overview; The Afferent Limb; The Efferent Limb
  • The Administrative Limb The Quality Improvement Limb; Summary; References; 4: Measuring Safety; Introduction; Approach for the Organizational Evaluation of Patient Safety; Measuring Defects; How Might We Improve Safety?; A Framework to Improve Reliability; Why RRSs Can Improve Safety; Conclusion; References; 5: Medical Trainees and Patient Safety; Safety Issues Specific to the Supervision and Involvement of Trainees in Healthcare Delivery; Preparing Undergraduates for Supervised Clinical Training; Supervising and Teaching Postgraduate Trainees in Clinical Practice
  • Safety Issues Associated with the Roles and Responsibilities Assigned to Trainees The Clinical Environment; Patient Safety and Medical Trainees in Training Institutions; Training Requirements and Supervision in an Era of Medical Specialisation; Medical Trainees and Systems for Identifying and Responding to At-Risk Patients; Summary; References; 6: RRS and the Culture of Safety; Hospital Culture and the Need for Rapid Response Systems; The Impact of a RRS on Hospital Culture; References; 7: Creating Process and Policy Change in Healthcare
  • Implementing the RRS: A Case Study in the Theory of PolicyReferences; 8: The Assessment and Interpretation of Vital Signs; Introduction; The Four Classic Vital Signs; What Is the "Normal Range" of the Four Traditional Vital Signs?; Pulse Rate; Blood Pressure; Temperature; Respiratory Rate; The Shock Index; Oximetry; Pain; Breathlessness; Mental and Functional Status; Mental Status; Functional Status; Age and Vital Signs; Vital Sign Trends; Laboratory Tests and Biomarkers; Summary; References; 9: Multiple Parameter Track and Trigger Systems; Background; Crisis Detection
  • How Often Should Vital Signs Be Assessed? The Response Algorithm; Performance of AWTTS; Strengths and Weaknesses of AWTTS; Conclusion; References; 10: Causes of Failure to Rescue; Introduction; Causes of FTR: Patient-Level Factors; Static Patient-Level Factors; Dynamic Physiologic Patient Data and Surveillance; Causes of FTR: Hospital- or System-ƯLevel Factors; Staffing and Education; Varying Staffing Levels Over Time of Day and Day of Week; Lack of Clinician Exposure to Instability Events on a Consistent Basis; Lack of Situation Awareness; Lack of Human Factors Awareness
Control code
MUHSLr2dda992988829
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
Second edition.
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319393919
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Other control number
10.1007/978-3-319-39391-9
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)992988829
Label
Textbook of rapid response systems : concept and implementation, Michael A. DeVita, Ken Hillman, editors
Publication
Copyright
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Dedication; Preface; Contents; Contributors; Part I: RRSs and Patient Safety; 1: Why Have a Rapid Response System? Cold with Fear: The Patient and Family Experience of Failure to Rescue; Lewis's Story; Noah's Story; D.J.'s Story; Curtis's Story; The Voice of the Patient; Patient-Activated Rapid Response; Beyond Patient Activation; The Learning Institution; Alyssa's Story; References; 2: Rapid Response Systems: History and Terminology; Principles; Terminology; Summary; References; 3: RRS's General Principles; Introduction; Overview; The Afferent Limb; The Efferent Limb
  • The Administrative Limb The Quality Improvement Limb; Summary; References; 4: Measuring Safety; Introduction; Approach for the Organizational Evaluation of Patient Safety; Measuring Defects; How Might We Improve Safety?; A Framework to Improve Reliability; Why RRSs Can Improve Safety; Conclusion; References; 5: Medical Trainees and Patient Safety; Safety Issues Specific to the Supervision and Involvement of Trainees in Healthcare Delivery; Preparing Undergraduates for Supervised Clinical Training; Supervising and Teaching Postgraduate Trainees in Clinical Practice
  • Safety Issues Associated with the Roles and Responsibilities Assigned to Trainees The Clinical Environment; Patient Safety and Medical Trainees in Training Institutions; Training Requirements and Supervision in an Era of Medical Specialisation; Medical Trainees and Systems for Identifying and Responding to At-Risk Patients; Summary; References; 6: RRS and the Culture of Safety; Hospital Culture and the Need for Rapid Response Systems; The Impact of a RRS on Hospital Culture; References; 7: Creating Process and Policy Change in Healthcare
  • Implementing the RRS: A Case Study in the Theory of PolicyReferences; 8: The Assessment and Interpretation of Vital Signs; Introduction; The Four Classic Vital Signs; What Is the "Normal Range" of the Four Traditional Vital Signs?; Pulse Rate; Blood Pressure; Temperature; Respiratory Rate; The Shock Index; Oximetry; Pain; Breathlessness; Mental and Functional Status; Mental Status; Functional Status; Age and Vital Signs; Vital Sign Trends; Laboratory Tests and Biomarkers; Summary; References; 9: Multiple Parameter Track and Trigger Systems; Background; Crisis Detection
  • How Often Should Vital Signs Be Assessed? The Response Algorithm; Performance of AWTTS; Strengths and Weaknesses of AWTTS; Conclusion; References; 10: Causes of Failure to Rescue; Introduction; Causes of FTR: Patient-Level Factors; Static Patient-Level Factors; Dynamic Physiologic Patient Data and Surveillance; Causes of FTR: Hospital- or System-ƯLevel Factors; Staffing and Education; Varying Staffing Levels Over Time of Day and Day of Week; Lack of Clinician Exposure to Instability Events on a Consistent Basis; Lack of Situation Awareness; Lack of Human Factors Awareness
Control code
MUHSLr2dda992988829
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
Second edition.
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319393919
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Other control number
10.1007/978-3-319-39391-9
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)992988829

Library Locations

    • J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences LibraryBorrow it
      1 Hospital Dr, Columbia, MO, 65201, US
      38.939544 -92.328377
Processing Feedback ...