Coverart for item
The Resource The cost of authority : manipulation and freedom in the New Testament, Graham Shaw

The cost of authority : manipulation and freedom in the New Testament, Graham Shaw

Label
The cost of authority : manipulation and freedom in the New Testament
Title
The cost of authority
Title remainder
manipulation and freedom in the New Testament
Statement of responsibility
Graham Shaw
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1944-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Shaw, Graham
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Authority
  • Liberty
  • Liberty
  • Authority
Label
The cost of authority : manipulation and freedom in the New Testament, Graham Shaw
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Introduction: authority and the significance of contradiction in the New Testament -- (a) the embarrassment of Christian history -- (b) oppressive and divisive authority in Christian history -- (c) the responsibility of a religion for its history -- (d) is religious authority necessarily oppressive and divisive? -- (e) the criticism which the New Testament invites: -- (i) the recognition of authority -- (ii) the appraisal of authority -- (f) Paul and Mark: the selection of the texts -- Part one: the letters of Paul -- 1. I Thessalonians -- (a) the authority of the founding father -- (b) the prayer of thanksgiving: flattery and manipulation -- (c) the use of divine authority: sexual prohibition and eschatological fantasy -- (d) the gospel: privilege and alienation -- (e) the delegation of authority -- 2. II Thessalonians -- (a) authority and authenticity -- (b) the response to persecution -- (c) eschatology and anxiety -- (d) exhortation to work -- (e) retrospect -- 3. Galatians -- (a) the challenge to Pauline authority -- (b) the basis of Paul's apostolate -- (c) the use of the authority of the Old Testament -- (d) alienation and the Christian identity -- (e) privilege and manipulation: sonship and the Spirit -- (f) the law and the freedom of the Christian -- (g) the Spirit and the lower nature -- (h) self-sustaining freedom -- (i) a financial footnote -- 4. Philippians -- (a) authority and persecution -- (b) the Law in retrospect -- (c) unity and conformity -- (d) a financial footnote
  • 5. I Corinthians -- (a) the divisiveness of Paul's unique authority -- (b) the unique wisdom and spirit of the gospel -- (c) the demand for unity -- (d) Paul's demand for obedience -- (e) the limitations of Christian freedom: -- (i) the discrediting of rival authority -- (ii) legal isolation -- (iii) sexual prohibition -- (f) apostolic rulings: -- (i) sexual behavior -- (ii) observance of the food laws -- (iii) the public deportment of women -- (iv) the conduct of Christian meetings -- (v) the discipline of the Spirit -- (g) the apostle of the resurrection -- (h) postscript -- 6. II Corinthians -- (a) the praise of God and self-dramatization -- (b) the relation of the apostle to his audience -- (c) tension between local and apostolic discipline -- (d) the separateness of the new community -- (e) the understanding dissent: the veil -- (f) the uses of a confused identity -- (g) the apostle as fund-raiser -- (h) Paul's determination to use his authority -- (i) the discrediting of opposition -- (j) Paul's defense of his apostolate -- (k) Paul's third coming: the threat of judgment -- 7. Colossians -- (a) Paul's relation to the Colossian church -- (b) Paul as the suffering servant -- (c) the use of prayer -- (d) the gospel as secret -- (e) the sue of Christology -- (f) baptismal asceticism: alienation and oppression -- 8. Philemon -- the gospel of freedom an social conflict -- 9. Romans -- (a) the apostle of the gospel -- (b) Paul's relation to the Romans -- (c) the condemnation of the gentiles -- (d) the condemnation of the Jews
  • (E) the transcendence of the gospel -- (f) faith as the key to the true Jewish identity and privilege -- (g) reconciliation with God: astonishment and certainty -- (h) the exploitation of the crucified identity -- (i) the prestige of the law reaffirmed -- (j) the privilege of the Spirit and the promise of resurrection -- (k) the quest for legitimacy: the dependence of the new on the old -- (l) the spiritual sacrifice and social conformity -- (m) freedom and mutual respect: the food laws -- (n) Romans 16: -- (i) status in the new community -- (ii) the kiss of peace: Paul's defense of his teaching -- (iii) doxology and control -- 10. The significance of the Pauline Letters -- (a) the recognition of authority -- the appropriateness of a method -- (b) the appraisal of authority -- the interpretation of Paul -- (c) The transition to Mark's Gospel -- Part two: the Gospel according to Mark -- 11. The Gospel according to Mark -- (a) the shape of the Gospel: baptism and its rationale -- (b) the recognition of Jesus' identity and the reader's privilege -- (c) the authentication of Jesus and the gospel: the assertion of theophany
  • 12. Mark: the power of Jesus -- (a) attention and expectation -- (b) exorcism and the price of dualism -- (c) the healing of the body -- (d) the control of nature -- (e) the escape from scarcity -- (f) prayer and the inculcation of faith -- 13. Mark: the authority of Jesus -- (a) the gospel as teaching -- (b) the authority of Jesus in relation to Judaism -- (c) the authority of Jesus and John the Baptist -- (d) the use of authority: anxiety and retribution -- (e) authority in conflict: (i) the challenge to moral an social prestige -- (ii) the perception of oppression -- (iii) the forgiveness of sins -- (f) sexuality and the forgiveness of sins -- 14. Mark: the dynamics of secrecy -- (a) the repudiation of visibility -- (b) human fabrication and the destruction of the temple -- (c) the context of secrecy: an eye to the audience -- (d) the ambivalence of secrecy: the exercise of freedom -- 15. Mark: the servants and beneficiaries of the Gospel -- (a) the political exploitation of secrecy -- (b) a polemic view of Jesus' representatives -- (c) the servants' use of their authority -- (d) the understanding of dissent and rejection -- Conclusion: counting the cost -- (a) towards a new approach to Scripture -- (b) where does this leave the truth of Christianity? -- (c) death: reversal of transcendence? -- (d) a God for whom we are responsible to each other -- (e) the plausibility of the church as a reconciling community -- (f) a clergyman's vocation -- (g) the Christian affirmation
Control code
8826505
Dimensions
23 cm
Edition
1st Fortress Press ed.
Extent
xi, 292 pages
Isbn
9780800617073
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Lccn
82048545
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(WaOLN)653444
Label
The cost of authority : manipulation and freedom in the New Testament, Graham Shaw
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Introduction: authority and the significance of contradiction in the New Testament -- (a) the embarrassment of Christian history -- (b) oppressive and divisive authority in Christian history -- (c) the responsibility of a religion for its history -- (d) is religious authority necessarily oppressive and divisive? -- (e) the criticism which the New Testament invites: -- (i) the recognition of authority -- (ii) the appraisal of authority -- (f) Paul and Mark: the selection of the texts -- Part one: the letters of Paul -- 1. I Thessalonians -- (a) the authority of the founding father -- (b) the prayer of thanksgiving: flattery and manipulation -- (c) the use of divine authority: sexual prohibition and eschatological fantasy -- (d) the gospel: privilege and alienation -- (e) the delegation of authority -- 2. II Thessalonians -- (a) authority and authenticity -- (b) the response to persecution -- (c) eschatology and anxiety -- (d) exhortation to work -- (e) retrospect -- 3. Galatians -- (a) the challenge to Pauline authority -- (b) the basis of Paul's apostolate -- (c) the use of the authority of the Old Testament -- (d) alienation and the Christian identity -- (e) privilege and manipulation: sonship and the Spirit -- (f) the law and the freedom of the Christian -- (g) the Spirit and the lower nature -- (h) self-sustaining freedom -- (i) a financial footnote -- 4. Philippians -- (a) authority and persecution -- (b) the Law in retrospect -- (c) unity and conformity -- (d) a financial footnote
  • 5. I Corinthians -- (a) the divisiveness of Paul's unique authority -- (b) the unique wisdom and spirit of the gospel -- (c) the demand for unity -- (d) Paul's demand for obedience -- (e) the limitations of Christian freedom: -- (i) the discrediting of rival authority -- (ii) legal isolation -- (iii) sexual prohibition -- (f) apostolic rulings: -- (i) sexual behavior -- (ii) observance of the food laws -- (iii) the public deportment of women -- (iv) the conduct of Christian meetings -- (v) the discipline of the Spirit -- (g) the apostle of the resurrection -- (h) postscript -- 6. II Corinthians -- (a) the praise of God and self-dramatization -- (b) the relation of the apostle to his audience -- (c) tension between local and apostolic discipline -- (d) the separateness of the new community -- (e) the understanding dissent: the veil -- (f) the uses of a confused identity -- (g) the apostle as fund-raiser -- (h) Paul's determination to use his authority -- (i) the discrediting of opposition -- (j) Paul's defense of his apostolate -- (k) Paul's third coming: the threat of judgment -- 7. Colossians -- (a) Paul's relation to the Colossian church -- (b) Paul as the suffering servant -- (c) the use of prayer -- (d) the gospel as secret -- (e) the sue of Christology -- (f) baptismal asceticism: alienation and oppression -- 8. Philemon -- the gospel of freedom an social conflict -- 9. Romans -- (a) the apostle of the gospel -- (b) Paul's relation to the Romans -- (c) the condemnation of the gentiles -- (d) the condemnation of the Jews
  • (E) the transcendence of the gospel -- (f) faith as the key to the true Jewish identity and privilege -- (g) reconciliation with God: astonishment and certainty -- (h) the exploitation of the crucified identity -- (i) the prestige of the law reaffirmed -- (j) the privilege of the Spirit and the promise of resurrection -- (k) the quest for legitimacy: the dependence of the new on the old -- (l) the spiritual sacrifice and social conformity -- (m) freedom and mutual respect: the food laws -- (n) Romans 16: -- (i) status in the new community -- (ii) the kiss of peace: Paul's defense of his teaching -- (iii) doxology and control -- 10. The significance of the Pauline Letters -- (a) the recognition of authority -- the appropriateness of a method -- (b) the appraisal of authority -- the interpretation of Paul -- (c) The transition to Mark's Gospel -- Part two: the Gospel according to Mark -- 11. The Gospel according to Mark -- (a) the shape of the Gospel: baptism and its rationale -- (b) the recognition of Jesus' identity and the reader's privilege -- (c) the authentication of Jesus and the gospel: the assertion of theophany
  • 12. Mark: the power of Jesus -- (a) attention and expectation -- (b) exorcism and the price of dualism -- (c) the healing of the body -- (d) the control of nature -- (e) the escape from scarcity -- (f) prayer and the inculcation of faith -- 13. Mark: the authority of Jesus -- (a) the gospel as teaching -- (b) the authority of Jesus in relation to Judaism -- (c) the authority of Jesus and John the Baptist -- (d) the use of authority: anxiety and retribution -- (e) authority in conflict: (i) the challenge to moral an social prestige -- (ii) the perception of oppression -- (iii) the forgiveness of sins -- (f) sexuality and the forgiveness of sins -- 14. Mark: the dynamics of secrecy -- (a) the repudiation of visibility -- (b) human fabrication and the destruction of the temple -- (c) the context of secrecy: an eye to the audience -- (d) the ambivalence of secrecy: the exercise of freedom -- 15. Mark: the servants and beneficiaries of the Gospel -- (a) the political exploitation of secrecy -- (b) a polemic view of Jesus' representatives -- (c) the servants' use of their authority -- (d) the understanding of dissent and rejection -- Conclusion: counting the cost -- (a) towards a new approach to Scripture -- (b) where does this leave the truth of Christianity? -- (c) death: reversal of transcendence? -- (d) a God for whom we are responsible to each other -- (e) the plausibility of the church as a reconciling community -- (f) a clergyman's vocation -- (g) the Christian affirmation
Control code
8826505
Dimensions
23 cm
Edition
1st Fortress Press ed.
Extent
xi, 292 pages
Isbn
9780800617073
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Lccn
82048545
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(WaOLN)653444

Library Locations

    • University of Missouri Libraries DepositoryBorrow it
      2908 Lemone Blvd, Columbia, MO, 65211, US
      38.919360 -92.291620
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