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The Resource The idea of disability in the eighteenth century, edited by Chris Mounsey

The idea of disability in the eighteenth century, edited by Chris Mounsey

Label
The idea of disability in the eighteenth century
Title
The idea of disability in the eighteenth century
Statement of responsibility
edited by Chris Mounsey
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • "The Idea of Disability in the Eighteenth Century explores the intersections between the ways disabled people were and are understood in history. It presents a new analysis of disability as an alternative to the foucauldian, called Variability, which is consciously historicist and centers on the individual as "the same only different" from the non-disabled. The essays in this collection examine Variability in three ways: philosophically (Margaret Cavendish, John Locke, Lord Shaftesbury, and Thomas Reid), conceptually (in the novel, personal statements, and journalism) and experientially (writer's biographies), and together demonstrate that disability was an active organizing principle of eighteenth-century thought and literature, as well as a viable way of life." - Book cover
  • The Idea of Disability in the Eighteenth Century explores disabled people who lived in the eighteenth century. The first four essays consider philosophical writing dating between 1663 and 1788, when the understanding of disability altered dramatically. We begin with Margaret Cavendish, whose natural philosophy rejected ideas of superiority or inferiority between individuals based upon physical or mental difference. We then move to John Locke, the founder of empiricism in 1680, who believed that the basis of knowledge was observability, but who, faced with the lack of anything to observe, broke his own epistemological rules in his explanation of mental illness. Understanding the problems that empiricism set up, Anthony Ashley Cooper, Lord Shaftesbury, turned in 1711 to moral philosophy, but also founded his philosophy on a flaw. He believed in the harmony of 2the aesthetic trinity of beauty, truth, and virtue3 but he could not believe that a disabled friend, whom he knew to have been moral before his physical alteration, could change inside. Lastly, we explore Thomas Reid who in 1788 returned to the body as the ground of philosophical enquiry and saw the body as a whole{u2014}complete in itself and wanting nothing, be it missing a sense (Reid was deaf) or a physical or mental capacity. At the heart of the study of any historical artifact is the question of where to look for evidence, and when looking for evidence of disability, we have largely to rely upon texts. However, texts come in many forms, and the next two essays explore three types{u2014}the novel, the periodical and the pamphlet{u2014}which pour out their ideas of disability in different ways. Evidence of disabled people in the eighteenth century is sparse, and the lives the more evanescent. The last four essays bring to light little known disabled people, or people who are little known for their disability, giving various forms of biographical accounts of Susanna Harrison, Sarah Scott, Priscilla Poynton and Thomas Gills, who are all but forgotten in the academic world as well as to public consciousness. --Provided by publisher
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
808.83/93527
Index
index present
LC call number
PN56.5.H35
LC item number
I34 2014
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1959-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Mounsey, Chris
Series statement
Transits: literature, thought & culture, 1650-1850
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • People with disabilities in literature
  • People with disabilities
  • Disability studies
  • Sociology of disability
  • Literature, Modern
  • People with disabilities in literature
  • People with disabilities
  • Disability studies
  • Sociology of disability
  • Literature
Label
The idea of disability in the eighteenth century, edited by Chris Mounsey
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
Introduction: Variability: beyond sameness and difference / Chris Mounsey -- Part one: Methodological -- "Perfect according to their kind": deformity, defect and disease in the natural philosophy of Margaret Cavendish / Holly Faith Nelson and Sharon Alker -- What's the matter with madness? John Locke, the association of ideas, and the physiology of thought / Jess Keiser -- Defections from nature: the rhetoric of deformity in Shaftesbury's Characteristics / Paul Kelleher -- Thomas Reid: Power as first philosophy / Emile Bojesen -- Part two: conceptual -- 'An HOBBY-HORSE well worth giving a description of: disability, trauma, and language in Tristram Shandy / Anna K. Sagal -- "One cannot be too secure": wrongful confinement, or, the pathologies of the domestic economy / Dana Gliserman Kopans -- "On that rock I lay": images of disability found in religious verse / Jamie Kinsley -- Attractive deformity: enabling the "shocking monster" from Sarah Scott's Agreeable Ugliness / Jason S. Farr -- Reading "the blind poetess of Lichfield": the consolatory odes of Priscilla Poynton / Jess Domanico -- God grant us grace, that we may take due pains, to practice what this exercise contains; to which, if we apply our best endeavour, we shall be happy here, and blessed forever. / Chris Mounsey
Control code
863789617
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
ix, 269 pages
Isbn
9781611485592
Isbn Type
(cloth : alk. paper)
Lccn
2013049457
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
System control number
(OCoLC)863789617
Label
The idea of disability in the eighteenth century, edited by Chris Mounsey
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
Introduction: Variability: beyond sameness and difference / Chris Mounsey -- Part one: Methodological -- "Perfect according to their kind": deformity, defect and disease in the natural philosophy of Margaret Cavendish / Holly Faith Nelson and Sharon Alker -- What's the matter with madness? John Locke, the association of ideas, and the physiology of thought / Jess Keiser -- Defections from nature: the rhetoric of deformity in Shaftesbury's Characteristics / Paul Kelleher -- Thomas Reid: Power as first philosophy / Emile Bojesen -- Part two: conceptual -- 'An HOBBY-HORSE well worth giving a description of: disability, trauma, and language in Tristram Shandy / Anna K. Sagal -- "One cannot be too secure": wrongful confinement, or, the pathologies of the domestic economy / Dana Gliserman Kopans -- "On that rock I lay": images of disability found in religious verse / Jamie Kinsley -- Attractive deformity: enabling the "shocking monster" from Sarah Scott's Agreeable Ugliness / Jason S. Farr -- Reading "the blind poetess of Lichfield": the consolatory odes of Priscilla Poynton / Jess Domanico -- God grant us grace, that we may take due pains, to practice what this exercise contains; to which, if we apply our best endeavour, we shall be happy here, and blessed forever. / Chris Mounsey
Control code
863789617
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
ix, 269 pages
Isbn
9781611485592
Isbn Type
(cloth : alk. paper)
Lccn
2013049457
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
System control number
(OCoLC)863789617

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