Coverart for item
The Resource "The most complete political machine ever known" : the North's Union Leagues in the American Civil War, Paul Taylor

"The most complete political machine ever known" : the North's Union Leagues in the American Civil War, Paul Taylor

Label
"The most complete political machine ever known" : the North's Union Leagues in the American Civil War
Title
"The most complete political machine ever known"
Title remainder
the North's Union Leagues in the American Civil War
Statement of responsibility
Paul Taylor
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
The martial enthusiasm that engulfed the North when the American Civil War commenced in April 1861 vanished by the following summer. Repeated military defeats, economic worries, and staggering casualties prompted many civilians to question the war's viability. Frustration exploded into anger when Republican president Abraham Lincoln issued his preliminary Emancipation Proclamation in September. The disgruntled voices grew louder. These anti-Lincoln Democrats, nicknamed "Copperheads," viewed blacks with disdain and considered many of Lincoln's legal decisions to be unconstitutional. Civilian disenchantment led to significant Republican defeats in the November Congressional elections. As 1862 ended, Northern morale was at rock bot- tom. Across the North, ardent pro-Lincoln men realized their country needed a patriotic stimulus, as well as an organized means of countering what they viewed as their Copperhead adversaries' treasonous pronouncements and subversion. These men formed what became known as Union Leagues: semisecretive societies whose members had to possess unconditional loyalty to the Lincoln administration and unwavering support for all of its efforts to suppress the rebellion. Their mysterious member initiation rites were likened to a solemn religious ceremony. In "The Most Complete Political Machine Ever Known," Paul Taylor examines the Union League movement. Often portrayed as a mere footnote to the Civil War, the Union League's influence on the Northern home front was far more important and consequential than previously considered. The Union League and its various offshoots spread rapidly across the North, and in this first comprehensive examination of the leagues, Taylor discusses what made them so effective, including their recruitment strategies, their use of ostracism as a way of stifling dissent, and their distribution of political propaganda in quantities unlike anything previously imagined. By the end of 1863, readers learn, it seemed as if every hamlet from Maine to California had formed its own league chapter, collectively overwhelming their Democratic foe in the 1864 presidential election
Member of
Cataloging source
EBLCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Taylor, Paul
Dewey number
973.7
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
E458.3
LC item number
.T39 2018
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Civil War in the North
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Union League of America
  • United States
  • United States
  • Patriotic societies
  • Union League of America
  • American Civil War (1861-1865)
  • Patriotic societies
  • Social aspects
  • United States
Label
"The most complete political machine ever known" : the North's Union Leagues in the American Civil War, Paul Taylor
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 253-309) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
mixed
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
"Quiet men are dangerous": civilian antecedents of the Union Leagues -- "There can be no neutrals in this war; only patriots or traitors": the demand for public loyalty -- "A fire of liberty burning upon the altar": the Union Leagues arise amidst despair and disillusionment -- "a refuge rather than a resort for loyalty": Philadelphia, New York, and Boston lead the way -- "We are learning to draw the line between treason and loyalty": Union League ostracism and Democratic resentment -- "This is the time for pamphleteers and essayists": the pen begins to fight alongside the sword against Copperhead dissent and violence -- "The 'loyal leagues' are really effecting public opinion": the broad-based loyal leagues and "no party now" -- "Neutrality is allied to treason; indifference becomes a crime; and whoever is not with us is against us": a Union League of America council in every town -- "We are not a partisan, yet we are a political organization": women enter the fray as midwest dissent boils over -- "We are organizing our leagues and getting ready for the great fight of 1864": an open arm of the Republican Party -- "Once more rally around the flag, and your work will be complete": a bitter and partisan election -- "It is a fatal mistake to hold that this war is over because the fighting has ceased": the Union League in Reconstruction
Control code
1035516487
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xiv, 322 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781631013355
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1035516487
Label
"The most complete political machine ever known" : the North's Union Leagues in the American Civil War, Paul Taylor
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 253-309) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
mixed
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
"Quiet men are dangerous": civilian antecedents of the Union Leagues -- "There can be no neutrals in this war; only patriots or traitors": the demand for public loyalty -- "A fire of liberty burning upon the altar": the Union Leagues arise amidst despair and disillusionment -- "a refuge rather than a resort for loyalty": Philadelphia, New York, and Boston lead the way -- "We are learning to draw the line between treason and loyalty": Union League ostracism and Democratic resentment -- "This is the time for pamphleteers and essayists": the pen begins to fight alongside the sword against Copperhead dissent and violence -- "The 'loyal leagues' are really effecting public opinion": the broad-based loyal leagues and "no party now" -- "Neutrality is allied to treason; indifference becomes a crime; and whoever is not with us is against us": a Union League of America council in every town -- "We are not a partisan, yet we are a political organization": women enter the fray as midwest dissent boils over -- "We are organizing our leagues and getting ready for the great fight of 1864": an open arm of the Republican Party -- "Once more rally around the flag, and your work will be complete": a bitter and partisan election -- "It is a fatal mistake to hold that this war is over because the fighting has ceased": the Union League in Reconstruction
Control code
1035516487
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xiv, 322 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781631013355
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)1035516487

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