Coverart for item
The Resource The nature and tendency of free institutions, by Frederick Grimke ; edited by John William Ward

The nature and tendency of free institutions, by Frederick Grimke ; edited by John William Ward

Label
The nature and tendency of free institutions
Title
The nature and tendency of free institutions
Statement of responsibility
by Frederick Grimke ; edited by John William Ward
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
First published in 1848, Frederick Grimke's book, in the words of the editor, "deserves comparison with Tocqueville's justly famous work, Democracy in America, and is in certain ways superior. It is the single best book written by an American in the nineteenth century on the meaning of our political way of life." A second edition of Grimke's work was published in 1856, and a third edition appeared posthumously in 1871, but since then this classic in American thought has been almost completely lost to sight. Grimke was born in South Carolina in 1791, and later moved to Ohio where he became a judge. He remained a bachelor, led a rich and cosmopolitan intellectual life, and accumulated an excellent library. His sisters Angelina (wife of the abolitionist Theodore Weld) and Sarah were both famous for deserting their South Carolina heritage and becoming active in the abolition and woman suffrage movements. In 1842 Grimke retired from the bench to devote the remainder of his life to study and writing, setting himself the task of educating his contemporaries in the nature of their society. His major achievement was The Nature and Tendency of Free Institutions. Grimke's range of topics includes the right of the majority, the character and operation of elective governments, the function of political parties, the American contrasted with the English and French constitutions, and the separation of powers in the American political systems. He sees governmental institutions as the expression of the general structure of society which calls them into being. In his Introduction, Mr. Ward points to Grimke's thesis "that the separation of powers in the frame of the American constitution works not because power is distributed within the government but because all branches of the government are, directly or indirectly, responsible to the will of the majority of the people outside the doors of government." As a result of the party system, Grimke wrote, "we may vary the paraphernalia of government as much as we please, but it still obstinately persists in every one of its departments to be a government based upon the popular will."Mr. Ward calls attention to Grimke's passionate belief that "freedom is its own justification" and that its ultimate value is that "it created the kind of character which made freedom possible." He held that "the only way to make a man fit for freedom is to give him freedom." Yet, unlike his sisters, he shared a view of race that was pervasive in his time and was unable to imagine the extension of freedom to the slave. In contradiction to his views of government and freedom, he upheld Negro slavery even to the extent of sanctioning secession to protect it. To him, "the open affirmation of the right of secession would serve to maintain the Union, not destroy it."
Member of
Action
digitized
Cataloging source
COO
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1791-1863
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Grimké, Frederick
Dewey number
320.9/73
Index
index present
Language note
In English
LC call number
  • JC212
  • KF4550
LC item number
.G87 1968eb online
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1922-1985
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Ward, John William
Series statement
The John Harvard library
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Political science
  • Constitutional law
  • Constitutional law
  • Political science
  • Politieke instellingen
  • Vrijheid
Label
The nature and tendency of free institutions, by Frederick Grimke ; edited by John William Ward
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Originally published in 1848 under title: Considerations upon the nature and tendency of free institutions
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
mixed
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
General views and difficulties of the science of government -- The foundation of government, and right of the majority to rule -- Character and operation of elective governments -- The principle of equality: to what extent can it be carried -- The electoral franchise -- The election of the public officers -- Parties: the office they fulfill in a republic -- A republic is essentially a government of restraint -- Written constitutions -- That in a republic the governors and governed are identical and different -- Sovereignty of the people: import of the phrase -- Political toleration: is it practicable? -- Monarchical government -- Notice of the English constitution -- The legislative power -- Religious institutions -- Institutions for the education of the people -- Military institutions -- Institution of the press -- Aristocratical institutions -- The institution of slavery -- The judicial power -- On what in America is sometimes termed the veto power of the states -- The right of secession in the confederate form of government -- The executive power -- The classes of society -- Notice of the French constitution -- Is the American government a balanced one? -- The influence of America upon Europe -- Ultimate destiny of free institutions
Control code
558411651
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (vi, 705 pages)
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780674284067
Lccn
68015638
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other control number
  • 9780674605008
  • 10.4159/harvard.9780674284067
Quality assurance targets
unknown
Reformatting quality
unknown
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)558411651
System details
Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.
Label
The nature and tendency of free institutions, by Frederick Grimke ; edited by John William Ward
Publication
Note
Originally published in 1848 under title: Considerations upon the nature and tendency of free institutions
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
mixed
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
General views and difficulties of the science of government -- The foundation of government, and right of the majority to rule -- Character and operation of elective governments -- The principle of equality: to what extent can it be carried -- The electoral franchise -- The election of the public officers -- Parties: the office they fulfill in a republic -- A republic is essentially a government of restraint -- Written constitutions -- That in a republic the governors and governed are identical and different -- Sovereignty of the people: import of the phrase -- Political toleration: is it practicable? -- Monarchical government -- Notice of the English constitution -- The legislative power -- Religious institutions -- Institutions for the education of the people -- Military institutions -- Institution of the press -- Aristocratical institutions -- The institution of slavery -- The judicial power -- On what in America is sometimes termed the veto power of the states -- The right of secession in the confederate form of government -- The executive power -- The classes of society -- Notice of the French constitution -- Is the American government a balanced one? -- The influence of America upon Europe -- Ultimate destiny of free institutions
Control code
558411651
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (vi, 705 pages)
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780674284067
Lccn
68015638
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other control number
  • 9780674605008
  • 10.4159/harvard.9780674284067
Quality assurance targets
unknown
Reformatting quality
unknown
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)558411651
System details
Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.

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