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The Resource The order of the synoptics : why three synoptic gospels?, Bernard Orchard, Harold Riley

The order of the synoptics : why three synoptic gospels?, Bernard Orchard, Harold Riley

Label
The order of the synoptics : why three synoptic gospels?
Title
The order of the synoptics
Title remainder
why three synoptic gospels?
Statement of responsibility
Bernard Orchard, Harold Riley
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1910-2006
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Orchard, Bernard
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Riley, Harold
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Synoptic problem
Label
The order of the synoptics : why three synoptic gospels?, Bernard Orchard, Harold Riley
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Includes indexes
Bibliography note
Bibliography: pages [282]-288
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Part One: The internal evidence / Harold Riley -- 1. The significance of order -- The problem of the order of the gospels -- The order of Mark and its parallels -- The rationale of order if Mark is first -- The rationale of order on the two-gospel hypothesis -- Markan priority possible only on the assumption that Matthew and Luke had worked together -- The clue of the roll format -- Mark's use of the scrolls of Matthew and Luke -- 2. The thematic order of Matthew -- Indications of order -- The coming of Jesus -- Galilee of the Gentiles -- The cities of Israel -- The chosen servant -- Seeing, hearing, understanding -- Jesus -- who is He? -- "A ransom for many" -- 3. Matthew and Mark -- The coming of Jesus -- Galilee of the Gentiles -- The cities of Israel -- The Chosen Servant -- Seeing, hearing,understanding -- Jesus -- who is He? -- "a ransom for many"
  • 4. The new order of Luke -- The pattern of Luke -- The introduction -- "All that Jesus began to do" -- "All that Jesus began to teach" -- "Until the day that he was taken up" -- 5. Luke and Mark -- The ministry in Luke and Mark -- Luke's central section -- Luke's narrative resumed -- 6. The making of Mark -- Why did Mark compile his book? -- Mark's omissions -- Mark's language -- Mark's annotations -- Mark's secondary characteristics -- Mark's independent features -- The ending of Mark's gospel -- Conclusions
  • Appendix 1: Styler's key passages -- The death of the Baptist -- The young man and Jesus -- The Son of David -- The disciples' private question -- Pilate's offer to release a prisoner -- The question about fasting -- Jairus's daughter -- The scribes' commendation of Jesus -- The injunction to secrecy -- Appendix 2: "The Baptist" -- John the Baptist -- Herod and the Baptist -- The death of the Baptist -- Appendix 3: Duality in Mark
  • Part Two: The historical tradition / Bernard Orchard -- 1. The state of the question -- The rejection of the tradition -- The revival of the tradition -- Survey of the emergence of the written tradition -- 2. The Matthean tradition before A.D. 150 -- The quotation of the Matthean tradition in Paul -- The gospels in Christian writings before Justin -- 3. Anti-Marcionite reaction (circa 150-250) -- The second-century witnesses to gospel authorship -- Justin (ca. 100-165) -- Marcion (ca. 80 -- ca. 160) -- Irenaeus (ca. 115 -- ca. 180) -- Clement of Alexandria (ca. 150-215) -- Tertullian (ca. 155-229) -- Origen (ca. 185-253) -- The consensus summaries
  • 4. Eusebius and the gospel traditions -- The scholar and his Ecclesiastical History -- Eusebius on the four gospels -- Eusebius on Irenaeus -- Eusebius on Clement of Alexandria -- Eusebius on Origen -- Eusebius on Papias -- Introduction to EH III.39 (about the writings of Papias) -- Summary of the findings on Eusebius's treatment of Papias's statements -- Excursus 1: Eusebius's bias for Hebrews and against the apocalypse -- Excursus 2: The origin of the notion of an "Aramaic" gospel of Matthew
  • 5. Fourth-century tradition after Eusebius -- Ephraem Syrus (ca. 306-373) -- Epiphanius (ca. 315-403) -- Ambrosiaster (fl. ca. 370-400) -- Jerome (ca. 342-420) -- The Monarchian prologues (ca. 380) -- The Vulgate prologues (ca. 380) -- Augustine of Hippo (354-430) -- Conclusions: Fourth-century traditions after Eusebius -- Appendix: Latin texts of Jerome and Augustine -- 6. The value of the external testimonies to the gospels
  • Part Three: How the synoptic gospels came into existence (A tentative reconstruction of the history of their composition by means of a synthesis of the evidence drawn from parts one and two) / Bernard Orchard -- 1. Foundations for a synthesis -- The problem and a tentative solution -- Some facts about the Gospel of Matthew -- Some facts about the Gospel of Luke -- Some facts about the Gospel of Mark -- 2. The composition of the Gospel of Matthew -- The Jerusalem church of Acts 1-12 -- The church's need met by the gospel of Matthew -- The construction of the gospel of Matthew -- The essential content of the Gospel of Matthew -- 3. The composition of Luke-Acts -- The circumcision question and the roles of Peter and Paul -- The purpose of Luke's gospel -- Some reasons for Paul's desire to visit Rome -- Could Peter and Paul have collaborated and/or met after 49? -- Peter in Rome -- Roman friends and collaborators of Peter and Paul -- The collaboration of Peter and Paul -- The original format of the gospels of Matthew and Luke -- The problem posed by Luke's gospel for the non-Pauline churches
  • 4. The composition of the Gospel of Mark -- The historical facts and their critical support -- The preparation of Peter's lectures -- The delivery of Peter's lectures -- The audience for Peter's lectures -- The publication of the Gospel of mark
Control code
15283083
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xiv, 294 pages
Isbn
9780865542228
Lccn
87005593
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(WaOLN)1009785
Label
The order of the synoptics : why three synoptic gospels?, Bernard Orchard, Harold Riley
Publication
Note
Includes indexes
Bibliography note
Bibliography: pages [282]-288
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Part One: The internal evidence / Harold Riley -- 1. The significance of order -- The problem of the order of the gospels -- The order of Mark and its parallels -- The rationale of order if Mark is first -- The rationale of order on the two-gospel hypothesis -- Markan priority possible only on the assumption that Matthew and Luke had worked together -- The clue of the roll format -- Mark's use of the scrolls of Matthew and Luke -- 2. The thematic order of Matthew -- Indications of order -- The coming of Jesus -- Galilee of the Gentiles -- The cities of Israel -- The chosen servant -- Seeing, hearing, understanding -- Jesus -- who is He? -- "A ransom for many" -- 3. Matthew and Mark -- The coming of Jesus -- Galilee of the Gentiles -- The cities of Israel -- The Chosen Servant -- Seeing, hearing,understanding -- Jesus -- who is He? -- "a ransom for many"
  • 4. The new order of Luke -- The pattern of Luke -- The introduction -- "All that Jesus began to do" -- "All that Jesus began to teach" -- "Until the day that he was taken up" -- 5. Luke and Mark -- The ministry in Luke and Mark -- Luke's central section -- Luke's narrative resumed -- 6. The making of Mark -- Why did Mark compile his book? -- Mark's omissions -- Mark's language -- Mark's annotations -- Mark's secondary characteristics -- Mark's independent features -- The ending of Mark's gospel -- Conclusions
  • Appendix 1: Styler's key passages -- The death of the Baptist -- The young man and Jesus -- The Son of David -- The disciples' private question -- Pilate's offer to release a prisoner -- The question about fasting -- Jairus's daughter -- The scribes' commendation of Jesus -- The injunction to secrecy -- Appendix 2: "The Baptist" -- John the Baptist -- Herod and the Baptist -- The death of the Baptist -- Appendix 3: Duality in Mark
  • Part Two: The historical tradition / Bernard Orchard -- 1. The state of the question -- The rejection of the tradition -- The revival of the tradition -- Survey of the emergence of the written tradition -- 2. The Matthean tradition before A.D. 150 -- The quotation of the Matthean tradition in Paul -- The gospels in Christian writings before Justin -- 3. Anti-Marcionite reaction (circa 150-250) -- The second-century witnesses to gospel authorship -- Justin (ca. 100-165) -- Marcion (ca. 80 -- ca. 160) -- Irenaeus (ca. 115 -- ca. 180) -- Clement of Alexandria (ca. 150-215) -- Tertullian (ca. 155-229) -- Origen (ca. 185-253) -- The consensus summaries
  • 4. Eusebius and the gospel traditions -- The scholar and his Ecclesiastical History -- Eusebius on the four gospels -- Eusebius on Irenaeus -- Eusebius on Clement of Alexandria -- Eusebius on Origen -- Eusebius on Papias -- Introduction to EH III.39 (about the writings of Papias) -- Summary of the findings on Eusebius's treatment of Papias's statements -- Excursus 1: Eusebius's bias for Hebrews and against the apocalypse -- Excursus 2: The origin of the notion of an "Aramaic" gospel of Matthew
  • 5. Fourth-century tradition after Eusebius -- Ephraem Syrus (ca. 306-373) -- Epiphanius (ca. 315-403) -- Ambrosiaster (fl. ca. 370-400) -- Jerome (ca. 342-420) -- The Monarchian prologues (ca. 380) -- The Vulgate prologues (ca. 380) -- Augustine of Hippo (354-430) -- Conclusions: Fourth-century traditions after Eusebius -- Appendix: Latin texts of Jerome and Augustine -- 6. The value of the external testimonies to the gospels
  • Part Three: How the synoptic gospels came into existence (A tentative reconstruction of the history of their composition by means of a synthesis of the evidence drawn from parts one and two) / Bernard Orchard -- 1. Foundations for a synthesis -- The problem and a tentative solution -- Some facts about the Gospel of Matthew -- Some facts about the Gospel of Luke -- Some facts about the Gospel of Mark -- 2. The composition of the Gospel of Matthew -- The Jerusalem church of Acts 1-12 -- The church's need met by the gospel of Matthew -- The construction of the gospel of Matthew -- The essential content of the Gospel of Matthew -- 3. The composition of Luke-Acts -- The circumcision question and the roles of Peter and Paul -- The purpose of Luke's gospel -- Some reasons for Paul's desire to visit Rome -- Could Peter and Paul have collaborated and/or met after 49? -- Peter in Rome -- Roman friends and collaborators of Peter and Paul -- The collaboration of Peter and Paul -- The original format of the gospels of Matthew and Luke -- The problem posed by Luke's gospel for the non-Pauline churches
  • 4. The composition of the Gospel of Mark -- The historical facts and their critical support -- The preparation of Peter's lectures -- The delivery of Peter's lectures -- The audience for Peter's lectures -- The publication of the Gospel of mark
Control code
15283083
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xiv, 294 pages
Isbn
9780865542228
Lccn
87005593
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(WaOLN)1009785

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