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The Resource Walter Benjamin and the antinomies of tradition, John McCole

Walter Benjamin and the antinomies of tradition, John McCole

Label
Walter Benjamin and the antinomies of tradition
Title
Walter Benjamin and the antinomies of tradition
Statement of responsibility
John McCole
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • "In this book I explore the origins and tensions of Walter Benjamin's dealings with tradition. Few thinkers in this century have been as perceptive about the workings of tradition, as acutely aware of their own relation to it, and as convinced of the necessity of recovering the past in order to redeem the present; of those, no other was at the same time so ready to face up to the complicity of culture in injustice and conclude that humanity would have to "prepare itself to survive culture, if need be." Benjamin at once mourned and celebrated what he took to be an inevitable liquidation of traditional culture, persistently trying to find the right way of salvaging what was useful. His refusal to surrender either of these attitudes and his determination to think both through to their conclusions lend his dealings with tradition their peculiar honesty. At the same time, this is also a book about how to make sense of this tension in Benjamin's work. It cannot, I argue, be reduced to psychological ambiguity or ambivalence about his social role, nor did it derive from a conception of tradition that can be traced to some intellectual influence. Rather, it was the consequence of a sustained argument with the entrenched orthodoxies of German intellectual culture, an argument through which Benjamin sought to keep faith with the experience of all that was "untimely, sorrowful, and unsuccessful" or, as he came to put it, to vindicate the oppressed of history. The Benjamin who appears here is not (or not just) a virtuoso reader, a micrological investigator of culture, or a master of mimetic interaction with his objects, though at times he could be all of those. The hallmark of his work lies in its paradoxical, antinomial coherence. This coherence, I argue, can best be explained by taking him at his word -- "the critic is a strategist in the literary struggle"--And reconstructing his pursuit of long-term intellectual strategies. These strategies originated in choices he made at the time of his break with the youth movement and were clearly articulated in his immanent critique of German early romanticism. While his strategies continued to develop in response to new circumstances, the formative influence of this early constellation can still be traced in his dealings with baroque Trauerspiel, technology, and aestheticism in his later work." -- from Preface (p. ix-x)
  • "In this book I explore the origins and tensions of Walter Benjamin's dealings with tradition. Few thinkers in this century have been as perceptive about the workings of tradition, as acutely aware of their own relation to it, and as convinced of the necessity of recovering the past in order to redeem the present; of those, no other was at the same time so ready to face up to the complicity of culture in injustice and conclude that humanity would have to "prepare itself to survive culture, if need be." Benjamin at once mourned and celebrated what he took to be an inevitable liquidation of traditional culture, persistently trying to find the right way of salvaging what was useful. His refusal to surrender either of these attitudes and his determination to think both through to their conclusions lend his dealings with tradition their peculiar honesty. At the same time, this is also a book about how to make sense of this tension in Benjamin's work. It cannot, I argue, be reduced to psychological ambiguity or ambivalence about his social role, nor did it derive from a conception of tradition that can be traced to some intellectual influence. Rather, it was the consequence of a sustained argument with the entrenched orthodoxies of German intellectual culture, an argument through which Benjamin sought to keep faith with the experience of all that was "untimely, sorrowful, and unsuccessful" or, as he came to put it, to vindicate the oppressed of history. The Benjamin who appears here is not (or not just) a virtuoso reader, a micrological investigator of culture, or a master of mimetic interaction with his objects, though at times he could be all of those. The hallmark of his work lies in its paradoxical, antinomial coherence. This coherence, I argue, can best be explained by taking him at his word -- "the critic is a strategist in the literary struggle" -- and reconstructing his pursuit of long-term intellectual strategies. These strategies originated in choices he made at the time of his break with the youth movement and were clearly articulated in his immanent critique of German early romanticism. While his strategies continued to develop in response to new circumstances, the formative influence of this early constellation can still be traced in his dealings with baroque Trauerspiel, technology, and aestheticism in his later work." -- from Preface (p. ix-x)
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1954-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
McCole, John
Dewey number
838/.91209
Index
index present
LC call number
PT2603.E455
LC item number
Z7335 1993
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Benjamin, Walter
  • Tradition (Philosophy)
  • Modernism (Aesthetics)
  • Europe
  • Cultuur
  • Traditie
  • Kritiek (algemeen)
  • Tradition
  • Modernisme (Esthétique)
  • Tradition
  • Cultuur
  • Kritiek (algemeen)
  • Traditie
Label
Walter Benjamin and the antinomies of tradition, John McCole
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 309-322) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction: Benjamin's Construction of the Antinomies of Tradition. 1. Benjamin on Tradition --- 2. The Reception of Benjamin's Work --- 3. Benjamin's Project and the Intellectual Field --- 4. The Argument ---- I. Benjamin and the Idea of Youth. 1. The Topography of the German Youth Movement --- 2. Gustav Wyneken's Ideological Ambiguities --- 3. Wyneken's "Strict and Fanatical Pupil" --- 4. Growing Estrangement --- 5. The Break with the Youth Movement ---- II. The Immanent Critique of Romanticism. 1. A "Harder, Purer, Less Visible Radicalism" --- 2. The Dynamics of Early Romanticism --- 3. Immanent Critique --- 4. Destruction and Completion of the Work: The Antinomies of Critique --- 5. Romantic Messianism: The Antinomies of Tradition --- 6. The Politics and Strategy of Interpretation ---- III. Allegorical Destruction. 1. "Goethe's Elective Affinities" --- 2. The Locus of the Trauerspiel Study --- 3. Symbol and Allegory --- 4. An Aesthetic of Destruction? The World of Baroque Allegorical Forms --- 5. Allegory and Critique ---- IV. Owning up to the Poverty of Experience: Benjamin and Weimar Modernism. 1. Developing Strategies: Modernism, Politics, and Nihilism --- 2. The Question of Neighborhoods: Mapping the Politics of Weimar Culture --- 3. Technik --- 4. Brecht ---- V. Benjamin and Surrealism: Awakening. 1. An Immanent Critique of Surrealism --- 2. "Dreamkitsch" --- 3. Surrealism as "The Last Snapshot of the European Intelligentsia" --- 4. Modern Mythology and Dream Consciousness --- 5. "Paris Arcades: A Dialectical Enchantment"? The Original Conception of the "Arcades" Project ---- VI. Benjamin and Proust: Remembering. 1. Benjamin's "Image of Proust" --- 2. Involuntary Memory --- 3. The Bridge between Memory and Dream --- 4. The Doctrine of Memory in Benjamin's Later Work ---- VII. The Antinomies of Tradition: Historical Rhythms in Benjamin's Late Works. 1. "Paris, Capital of the Nineteenth Century" --- 2. Dialectical Images --- 3. The Antinomies of Tradition ---- Conclusion: Benjamin's Recasting of the German Intellectual Tradition
Control code
26720033
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xiii, 329 pages
Isbn
9780801424656
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
92021431
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
(WaOLN)1519134
Label
Walter Benjamin and the antinomies of tradition, John McCole
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 309-322) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction: Benjamin's Construction of the Antinomies of Tradition. 1. Benjamin on Tradition --- 2. The Reception of Benjamin's Work --- 3. Benjamin's Project and the Intellectual Field --- 4. The Argument ---- I. Benjamin and the Idea of Youth. 1. The Topography of the German Youth Movement --- 2. Gustav Wyneken's Ideological Ambiguities --- 3. Wyneken's "Strict and Fanatical Pupil" --- 4. Growing Estrangement --- 5. The Break with the Youth Movement ---- II. The Immanent Critique of Romanticism. 1. A "Harder, Purer, Less Visible Radicalism" --- 2. The Dynamics of Early Romanticism --- 3. Immanent Critique --- 4. Destruction and Completion of the Work: The Antinomies of Critique --- 5. Romantic Messianism: The Antinomies of Tradition --- 6. The Politics and Strategy of Interpretation ---- III. Allegorical Destruction. 1. "Goethe's Elective Affinities" --- 2. The Locus of the Trauerspiel Study --- 3. Symbol and Allegory --- 4. An Aesthetic of Destruction? The World of Baroque Allegorical Forms --- 5. Allegory and Critique ---- IV. Owning up to the Poverty of Experience: Benjamin and Weimar Modernism. 1. Developing Strategies: Modernism, Politics, and Nihilism --- 2. The Question of Neighborhoods: Mapping the Politics of Weimar Culture --- 3. Technik --- 4. Brecht ---- V. Benjamin and Surrealism: Awakening. 1. An Immanent Critique of Surrealism --- 2. "Dreamkitsch" --- 3. Surrealism as "The Last Snapshot of the European Intelligentsia" --- 4. Modern Mythology and Dream Consciousness --- 5. "Paris Arcades: A Dialectical Enchantment"? The Original Conception of the "Arcades" Project ---- VI. Benjamin and Proust: Remembering. 1. Benjamin's "Image of Proust" --- 2. Involuntary Memory --- 3. The Bridge between Memory and Dream --- 4. The Doctrine of Memory in Benjamin's Later Work ---- VII. The Antinomies of Tradition: Historical Rhythms in Benjamin's Late Works. 1. "Paris, Capital of the Nineteenth Century" --- 2. Dialectical Images --- 3. The Antinomies of Tradition ---- Conclusion: Benjamin's Recasting of the German Intellectual Tradition
Control code
26720033
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xiii, 329 pages
Isbn
9780801424656
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
92021431
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
(WaOLN)1519134

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