The Resource The antinomies of a monological use of language : a defense of ordinary language in cognitive science, by Elizabeth M. Van Mil

The antinomies of a monological use of language : a defense of ordinary language in cognitive science, by Elizabeth M. Van Mil

Label
The antinomies of a monological use of language : a defense of ordinary language in cognitive science
Title
The antinomies of a monological use of language
Title remainder
a defense of ordinary language in cognitive science
Statement of responsibility
by Elizabeth M. Van Mil
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This project consists of a critique of the theories of Paul Churchland and Daniel Dennett, as two distinct representatives of contemporary philosophy of cognitive science. It is not framed within the context of current debates in cognitive science, but employs a philosophy of language approach; language is held to be significant for cognitive activity and development as well as an optimal mode for intersubjective communication. The literature for this project includes American, Feminist and Continental Philosophy, hence bridging those traditions in the philosophy of mind and philosophy of language, as well as theories of communication and developmental psychology. The first chapter describes the multiple semantic roles of ordinary language relative to conventional and specialized languages, and shows that ordinary language cannot be reduced to either of the latter without serious consequences for the possibility of communication. The context for why language is central in Dennett's and Churchland's theories is outlined, and also their vision of a unity of science that inspires them. For the critiques, a framework is outlined that depicts a reductionist view of language, entitled a monological use of language as a sharp contrast to ordinary language. It consists of three features: essentialism, atomistic materialism, and metaphysical solipsism. It is argued that reliance upon this view of language has serious negative implications, simultaneously and for the same reasons, for the possibility of cognitive, social, and scientific development and progress. The second and third parts provide detailed critiques, respectively, of Paul Churchland's and Daniel Dennett's theories of cognitive science. Their theoretical commitments are identified and their arguments in support of their views are traced in detail. Problems are disclosed that are attributable to their subscribing to a monological view of language, both internal contradictions and empirical counter-evidence which I call antinomies. The tenth chapter identifies commitments that cannot be central for cognitive theorists if they wish to avoid the kinds of antinomies found in the second and third parts. Alternative approaches are outlined as a sequence of less to more adequate viewpoints, with the criteria for selection based upon the extent to which the approach can account for intersubjective uses of language in communication. The theories in this series include those of: John Searle, Jurgen Habermas, Seyla Benhabib, Abraham Maslow, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Marjorie Grene, and Bernhard Waldenfels. The concluding section contains a list of findings, and indicates a significant role for philosophy in defence of ordinary language as a form of communication to enlighten the debates in the emerging paradigm in philosophy of cognitive science
Additional physical form
Also available on the Internet.
Cataloging source
MUU
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1945-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Van Mil, Elizabeth M.
Degree
Ph. D.
Dissertation year
1994.
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Granting institution
University of Missouri-Columbia
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Churchland, Paul M
  • Dennett, D. C.
  • Cognitive science
  • Language and languages
  • Antinomy
  • Philosophy, American
  • Philosophy, European
Target audience
specialized
Label
The antinomies of a monological use of language : a defense of ordinary language in cognitive science, by Elizabeth M. Van Mil
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Permission to use letters at end of volume 2
  • Typescript
  • Vita
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 462-595)
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
not applicable
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
36403674
Dimensions
29 cm
Extent
2 volumes (xiv, 596 pages, 11 unnumbered leaves)
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
Label
The antinomies of a monological use of language : a defense of ordinary language in cognitive science, by Elizabeth M. Van Mil
Publication
Note
  • Permission to use letters at end of volume 2
  • Typescript
  • Vita
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 462-595)
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
not applicable
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
36403674
Dimensions
29 cm
Extent
2 volumes (xiv, 596 pages, 11 unnumbered leaves)
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

    • Ellis LibraryBorrow it
      1020 Lowry Street, Columbia, MO, 65201, US
      38.944491 -92.326012
    • University of Missouri Libraries DepositoryBorrow it
      2908 Lemone Blvd, Columbia, MO, 65211, US
      38.919360 -92.291620
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